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Latest Crust Stories

Image 1 - Scientists Examine Peculiar Underwater Mountain
2012-03-27 10:53:47

Scientists have recently finalized an expedition in an effort to learn more about an undersea mountain they say may have formed in a very different way than the rest of the seafloor. Aboard the JOIDES (Joint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling) research ship, these scientists studied the formations and makeup of Atlantis Massif. This undersea mountain has been found to be made up of rocks typically found much deeper in the oceans crust. Other volcanic seamounts are usually...

2012-03-26 09:21:40

A layer of partially molten rock about 22 to 75 miles underground can't be the only mechanism that allows continents to gradually shift their position over millions of years, according to a NASA-sponsored researcher. The result gives insight into what allows plate tectonics — the movement of the Earth's crustal plates — to occur. "This melt-rich layer is actually quite spotty under the Pacific Ocean basin and surrounding areas, as revealed by my analysis of seismometer data,"...

Scientists Study Deep Rocks Under Pacific Ocean
2012-03-23 07:12:56

Scientists interested in the construction of the rock layers immediately under the Earth´s crust, the lithosphere and asthenosphere, have new tools to help analyze these layers and further understand plate tectonics. The researchers have been using seismic waves to study the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. This boundary is where the hot, convecting mantle asthenosphere and the overlying cold and rigid lithosphere meet. It has been found that seismic waves move faster...

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2012-03-13 16:17:36

The ESA´s GOCE satellite has produced the first global high-resolution map of the boundary between the Earth´s mantle and its crust, according to an ESA press release. Understanding the mantle-or MoHo-could provide us with clues about the Earth´s interior. The Earth´s crust makes up only 1% total volume of our planet and is just the outermost shell. However, this 1% is very important to the overall makeup of the Earth. Geological resources such as oil and minerals...

2012-03-12 21:04:59

Geologists at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne have come up with a new idea as to how the earliest continents were formed The earth's structure can be compared to an orange: its crust is the peel supported by the earth's heavy mantle. That peel is made up of a continental crust 30 to 40 kilometers thick. It is much lighter than the thinner oceanic crust and protrudes from the earth's mantle because of its lower density, like an iceberg in the sea. "According to the current theory, the...

Mapping The Moho With GOCE
2012-03-11 06:35:30

The first global high-resolution map of the boundary between Earth´s crust and mantle — the Moho — has been produced based on data from ESA´s GOCE gravity satellite. Understanding the Moho will offer new clues into the dynamics of Earth´s interior. Earth´s crust is the outermost solid shell of our planet. Even though it makes up less than 1% of the volume of the planet, the crust is exceptionally important not just because we live on it, but because is the...

Image 1 - When Continents Collide
2012-03-01 09:00:58

A new twist to a 50 million-year-old tale Fifty million years ago, India slammed into Eurasia, a collision that gave rise to the tallest landforms on the planet, the Himalaya Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. India and Eurasia continue to converge today, though at an ever-slowing pace. University of Michigan geomorphologist and geophysicist Marin Clark wanted to know when this motion will end and why. She conducted a study that led to surprising findings that could add a new wrinkle to...

2012-02-22 21:32:41

A mysterious cycle of booms and busts in marine biodiversity over the past 500 million years could be tied to a periodic uplifting of the world's continents, scientists report in the March issue of The Journal of Geology. The researchers discovered periodic increases in the amount of the isotope strontium-87 found in marine fossils. The timing of these increases corresponds to previously discovered low points in marine biodiversity that occur in the fossil record roughly every 60 million...


Latest Crust Reference Libraries

4_33609f8ebef994f54be143abe0bef9f42
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Earth -- in geology and astronomy, fifth largest planet of the solar system and the only planet definitely known to support life. Gravitational forces have molded the earth, like all celestial bodies, into a spherical shape. However, the earth is not an exact sphere, being slightly flattened at the poles and bulging at the equator. The equatorial diameter is c.7,926 mi (12,760 km) and the polar diameter 7,900 mi (12,720 km); the circumference at the equator is c.24,830 mi (40,000 km)....

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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