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Latest Cryogenian Stories

2012-01-27 10:44:18

University of Miami study offers new geochemical clues to understand conditions just prior to major climatic event In a study published in the journal Geology, scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science suggest that the large changes in the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates which occurred prior to the major climatic event more than 500 million years ago, known as 'Snowball Earth,' are unrelated to worldwide glacial events. "Our...

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2010-12-15 05:35:00

Researchers in Britain and Australia have discovered evidence that parts of the open ocean may have experienced a catastrophic global freeze some 700 million years ago, which nearly wiped out life on Earth. The event, dubbed "Snowball Earth", created such turbulent seas that microorganisms barely survived, and created conditions so harsh that most life is believed to have perished, the scientists said. The researchers claim to have found deposits in the remote Flinders Ranges in South...

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2010-08-18 06:15:00

Scientists have found fossils which suggest that animal life appeared on Earth millions of years earlier than previously thought, according to Princeton University and National Science Foundation (NSF) press releases published Tuesday. The fossils, which were described as "shelly" and are believed to have bellowed to primitive sponge-like creatures that dwelled in ocean reefs, were unearthed below 635 million year old South Australian glacial deposits. According to the NSF, those sponge-like...

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2010-05-02 08:15:28

For insight into what can happen when the Earth's carbon cycle is altered -- a cause and consequence of climate change -- scientists can look to an event that occurred some 720 million years ago. New data from a Princeton University-led team of geologists suggest that an episode called "snowball Earth," which may have covered the continents and oceans in a thick sheet of ice, produced a dramatic change in the carbon cycle. This change in the carbon cycle, in turn, may have triggered future...

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2010-03-05 07:33:29

Scientists find signs of 'snowball Earth' amidst early animal evolution Geologists have found evidence that sea ice extended to the equator 716.5 million years ago, bringing new precision to a "snowball Earth" event long suspected to have taken place around that time. Led by scientists at Harvard University, the team reports on its work this week in the journal Science. The new findings -- based on an analysis of ancient tropical rocks that are now found in remote northwestern Canada --...

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2009-02-04 17:29:32

Scientists announced on Wednesday the discovery of the earliest evidence of animal life to date. Chemical traces found in 635-million-year-old rocks in Oman provide key evidence to support Darwin's theory that simple organisms existed before the evolution of more complex creatures, researchers said in the Feb. 5 issue of the journal Nature. "Basically we have found a thread of that evidence that he predicted should be there," Roger Summons, a geobiologist at the Massachusetts Institute of...


Latest Cryogenian Reference Libraries

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:10:56

The Neoproterozoic is the third of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 1 billion years ago to 542 million years ago). This terminal era of the Proterozoic is itself divided into three sub-periods called the Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran Periods. The most severe glaciation known in the geologic record occurred during the Cryogenian Period, when ice sheets reached the equator and formed a possible “Snowball Earth.” And the earliest fossils of multi-cellular life...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.