Quantcast

Latest Crystal Stories

2010-07-16 14:27:37

Chemists from New York University and Russia's St. Petersburg State University have created crystals that can twist and untwist, pointing to a much more varied process of crystal growth than previously thought. Their work, which appears in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society, may explain some of the properties of high-polymers, which are used in clothing and liquid crystal displays, among other consumer products. Crystal growth has traditionally been viewed as a...

4f06e846ecbaf6a3bc5bc75ac6c181421
2010-05-22 08:43:02

Physicists from the University of Pennsylvania and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have reported an elegant experimental study of the melting behaviors of thin crystalline films, uncovering a variety of interesting differences between thick films of greater than four layers and thinner or single-layer films. Put simply, thin crystalline films melt differently depending on thickness.  The scientists made crystalline films from closely packed micron size gel beads. ...

2010-03-03 13:41:11

KINGSTON, ON "“ The same antifreeze proteins that keep organisms from freezing in cold environments can also prevent ice from melting at warmer temperatures, according to a new Queen's University study. The study presents the first direct measurements of the superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions. Superheated ice crystals can be stabilized above the melting point for hours, at a maximum temperature of about +0.5 degree Celsius. "You can hold the ice crystal at...

2010-01-25 15:00:43

Crystals resemble some biological structures; finding opens door to new technologies X-rays can do a lot of useful things -- detect broken bones, tumors and dental cavities, analyze atoms in diverse materials and screen luggage at airports -- but who knew they could cause crystals to form? A team of Northwestern University researchers has discovered that X-rays can trigger the formation of a new type of crystal: charged cylindrical filaments ordered like a bundle of pencils experiencing...

fc95c85281b803927f20010d9f9d283a1
2010-01-22 10:32:47

Research could improve manufacture of defect-free, thin films needed to make semiconductors The quest for faster electronic devices recently got something more than a little bump up in technological knowhow. Scientists at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. discovered that the thin, smooth, crystalline sheets needed to make semiconductors, which are the foundation of modern computers, might be grown into smoother sheets by managing the random darting motions of the atomic particles that affect...

5092e49ce85bd8179eb3636826fc35ee1
2009-12-24 06:30:00

Yet another holiday season is here and what would Christmas be without the critique of what is right and what is wrong when it comes to the holidays? This time around its not whether we should say Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays, but criticism over how snowflakes are depicted in popular children's books and holiday cards. These "faux" snowflakes have four, five, and sometimes eight sides and seem to defy the laws of physics. Manufacturers of Christmas cards, advertising agencies and book...

2009-12-23 08:14:10

Some of the most common minerals in biology, including those in bones and shells, have a mysterious structure: Their crystals are positioned in the same orientation, making them behave as one giant crystal, even though they do not look like a faceted crystal. It's as if grains of salt were spilled on a rug, yet instead of landing randomly, all wound up with exactly the same angle and rotation. In a new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Pupa Gilbert, a professor of physics...

2009-12-10 07:00:00

CAMBRIDGE, England, December 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) is proud to announce an important milestone in the history of crystallography - the archiving of the 500,000th small molecule crystal structure to the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). This unique, scientifically rigorous database, built over 45 years, is the international de facto standard for small-molecule chemical structures and has become an essential resource to scientists around the...

2009-12-09 20:07:51

In a study that elevates the role of entropy in creating order, research led by the University of Michigan shows that certain pyramid shapes can spontaneously organize into complex quasicrystals. A quasicrystal is a solid whose components exhibit long-range order, but without a single pattern or a unit cell that repeats. A paper on the findings appears in the Dec. 10 issue of Nature. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University and Kent State University collaborated on the study. Entropy...

d0e0b77de4587254f0cb30a11b70af68
2009-12-07 14:41:57

There is more to the snowflake than its ability to delight schoolchildren and snarl traffic. The structure of the frosty flakes also fascinate ice chemists like Purdue University's Travis Knepp, a doctoral candidate in analytical chemistry who studies the basics of snowflake structure to gain more insight into the dynamics of ground-level, or "tropospheric," ozone depletion in the Arctic. "A lot of chemistry occurs on ice surfaces," Knepp said. "By better understanding the physical structure...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
Related