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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 13:19 EDT

Latest CSH Protocols Stories

2011-10-12 15:29:00

OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Co-Discoverer of the DNA structure, Dr. James Watson and Pandora (NYSE: P) Founder and Chief Strategy Officer, Tim Westergren discussed their respective genome projects (Music and Human) at a private Pandora town hall event, hosted at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory DNA Learning Center on October 6, 2011 in Long Island, NY. In the open-forum discussion, both speakers focused on the foundational similarities they experienced while creating...

2011-01-04 03:58:30

New technologies and methods are spurring a renaissance in the study of organogenesis. Organogenesis, essentially the process through which a group of cells becomes a functioning organ, has important connections to biological processes at the cellular and developmental levels, and its study offers great potential for medical treatments through tissue engineering approaches. The January issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (http://cshprotocols.cshlp.org/TOCs/toc1_11.dtl) features a method...

2010-11-01 22:35:57

Imaging has rapidly become a defining tool of the current era in biological research. But finding the right method and optimizing it for data collection can be a daunting process, even for an established imaging laboratory. Cold Spring Harbor Protocols is one of the world's leading sources for detailed technical instruction for implementation of imaging methods(http://cshprotocols.cshlp.org/cgi/collection/imaging_microscopy_general), and the November issue...

2010-08-03 14:50:28

Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial restriction enzymes made by fusing an engineered zinc finger DNA-binding domain to the DNA cleavage domain of a restriction enzyme. ZFNs can be used to generate targeted genomic deletions of large segments of DNA in a wide variety of cell types and organisms. In the August issue of the journal Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (http://cshprotocols.cshlp.org/TOCs/toc8_10.dtl), Jin-Soo Kim and colleagues...

2010-07-02 20:17:29

Since the early days of the 20th century and Thomas Hunt Morgan's famous "Fly Room" at Columbia University, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been at the forefront of biological research. The powerful arsenal of experimental methods developed for this model organism is now being used to tackle one of the great scientific challenges of a new century: understanding the nervous system. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Neurobiology of Drosophila course...

2010-04-02 09:10:56

The goal of tissue engineering is to recapitulate healthy human organs and tissue structures in culture, and then transplant them into patients, where they are fully integrated. This is a complicated process, and the use of high-throughput imaging systems that allow researchers to directly monitor transplanted tissues in live animals over time is important for improving the culturing and implantation techniques, as well as the design of artificial tissue scaffolds. By using transgenic animals...

2010-02-01 18:39:09

Mapping DNase I hypersensitive sites has long been the standard method for identifying genetic regulatory elements such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, and locus control regions. Sequences that are nucleosome-depleted, presumably to provide access for transcription factors, are selectively digested by DNase I. Traditional low-throughput methods use Southern blots to then identify these hypersensitive sites. In the February issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols...

2010-01-04 16:00:12

Metagenomics, the study of DNA isolated from samples of naturally occurring microbial populations, is rapidly growing. Improvements to cloning and sequencing techniques are allowing researchers to study microorganisms in environmental samples, and new knowledge of species interactions and community dynamics is emerging. The identification of microorganisms in these samples is of vital importance to interpreting the results of such studies. In the January issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols...

2009-12-02 11:26:54

Live cell imaging techniques are driving a revolution in biological research. Instead of viewing dead tissues and cells fixed at a particular stage of activity, scientists can now visualize dynamic changes as they happen, permitting a better understanding of biological processes. The revolution has been fueled by the implementation of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, the subject of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry...

2009-11-03 12:42:12

The introduction of high-throughput laboratory methods has greatly increased the pace of research into the genetics of complex diseases. Instead of focusing only on one or a few coding variants in a small sample of individuals, the ability to accurately and efficiently genotype many individuals and to cover more of the variation within individual genes has resulted in genetic studies with greater statistical power. "Laboratory Methods for High-Throughput Genotyping," from Howard Edenberg and...