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Latest Ctenophora Stories

jellyfish ctenophore
2014-05-23 05:16:26

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from a massive international team of researchers has shown that there is more than one way to “make an animal,” which could completely reshape 200 years of zoological theory. The study focused on the genomic blueprints for 10 species of comb jellies, or ctenophores, and discovered that the simple animals developed complex organs, neurons, muscles and behaviors independently from sponges, previously thought to be the...

Comb Jelly Insight Evolution Of Life
2013-12-13 11:41:18

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) has indicated that a reshuffling of the evolutionary tree for the animal kingdom may be in order. The study, which was published in the journal Science, challenged the idea that complex cell types, like neurons and muscle cells, evolved only once, after simple animals that don’t have these cells diverged from the rest of the animal kingdom. The...


Latest Ctenophora Reference Libraries

Warty Comb Jelly, Mnemiopsis leidyi
2014-01-05 00:00:00

The Warty Comb Jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi), also known as the Sea Walnut, is a species of tentaculate ctenophore originally native to the western Atlantic coastal waters. Three species of Mnemiopsis have been named, but are now generally categorized as different ecological forms of the species leidyi. This species tolerates a wide range of salinity (2 to 38 psu), temperature (36 to 90 degrees F), and water quality. This creature was introduced in the Black Sea in the 1980s, where only one...

Bathocyroe fosteri
2014-01-05 00:00:00

Bathocyroe fosteri is a species of lobate ctenophore found in all oceans around the world. It is typically found at intermediate depths and is very abundant near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This deep-sea comb jelly is named for Alvin (DSV-2) pilot Dudley Foster, who is credited with first collecting the specimens. This specimen measures about two inches tall and is bioluminescent. This species, as well as other ctenophores, reproduce sexually, with little to know self-fertilization known....

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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