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Latest Curculionidae Stories

Using Fungus To Stop Invasive Spread Of Tree-Of-Heaven
2014-05-10 04:00:57

By Matt Swayne, Penn State A naturally occurring fungus might help curb the spread of an invasive tree species that is threatening forests in most of the United States, according to researchers. Researchers tested the fungus -- Verticillium nonalfalfae -- by injecting it into tree-of-heaven, or Ailanthus, plots, according to Matthew Kasson, who recently received his doctorate in plant pathology and environmental microbiology from Penn State. The treatment completely eradicated the...

Rocky Mountain National Park
2014-04-22 07:07:03

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An infestation of bark beetles is killing trees in the mountains across the western US. The beetles all reproduce in the inner bark of the trees, though they kill the trees in different ways. For example, the mountain pine beetle attacks and kills live trees, while other species live in dead, weakened or dying trees. In fact, more than 3.4 million acres of pine trees in Colorado alone have fallen to the mountain pine beetle....

Slippery Bark Helps Protect Trees From Pine Beetle Attack
2013-12-23 13:45:28

University of Colorado Boulder Trees with smoother bark are better at repelling attacks by mountain pine beetles, which have difficulty gripping the slippery surface, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. The findings, published online in the journal Functional Ecology, may help land managers make decisions about which trees to cull and which to keep in order to best protect forested properties against pine beetle infestation. The current mountain pine...

Bait Research Focused On Outsmarting Destructive Mountain Pine Beetle
2013-11-15 13:41:44

University of Alberta University of Alberta researchers are closing in on finding an effective bait to get ahead of the destructive spread of mountain pine beetle, which is now killing not only lodgepole pine forests, but jack pine. Nadir Erbilgin, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Forest Entomology in the University of Alberta Department of Renewable Resources, has been investigating pheromones emitted by the pest in North America's lodgepole and jack pine forests....

Treasure Trove Of Jewel-like Beetles Discovered
2013-10-15 12:05:26

Pensoft Publishers The bottomless pit of insect biodiversity has yielded a treasure trove of new species of jewel-like clown beetles. In a paper published today in the journal ZooKeys, Michael Caterino and Alexey Tishechkin of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History describe 85 new species in the genus Baconia, renowned for their brilliant coloration and bizarrely flattened body forms. The new species bring the genus up to 116 total species. The new species, mainly from North and...

Climate Change Produces Complicated Consequences For North America's Forests
2013-10-15 11:35:58

Dartmouth College Dartmouth-led study is the most comprehensive review of warming's impacts on forest pests, diseases Climate change affects forests across North America – in some cases permitting insect outbreaks, plant diseases, wildfires and other problems -- but Dartmouth researchers say warmer temperatures are also making many forests grow faster and some less susceptible to pests, which could boost forest health and acreage, timber harvests, carbon storage, water recycling and...

Massive Spruce Beetle Outbreak In Colorado Tied To Drought
2013-10-10 13:03:38

University of Colorado Boulder A new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates drought high in the northern Colorado mountains is the primary trigger of a massive spruce beetle outbreak that is tied to long-term changes in sea-surface temperatures from the Northern Atlantic Ocean, a trend that is expected to continue for decades. The new study is important because it shows that drought is a better predictor of spruce beetle outbreaks in northern Colorado than temperature alone,...

Fungal-farming Beetle Threatening Avocado Crops
2013-07-18 13:04:01

Penn State Beetles with unusual "green thumbs" for growing fungi are threatening avocado crops and could transform into a more destructive pest, according to an international team of researchers. Ambrosia beetles are insects that bore into trees and cultivate fungi to use as a food source for their young. The fungi -- species of Fusarium -- carried by types of the Ambrosia beetle can damage or even kill trees, making the beetle and its fungi a threat to avocado production in the U.S....

2013-04-19 14:24:25

℠Keep it simple´ is a good rule of thumb when designing biocontrol programs to combat weeds and invasive plants, according to a meta-analysis of studies by UBC biodiversity experts. Biocontrol programs use an invasive plant´s natural enemies (insects and pathogens) to reduce its population. Most biocontrol programs combine many different enemies — typically about three different species, but sometimes as many as 25 — with the hope that at least one will prove...


Latest Curculionidae Reference Libraries

Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta
2014-04-27 08:06:16

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is found in western North America in the upper mountains and subalpine regions of Colorado’s northern Rocky Mountains. This tree is considered to be invasive in New Zealand. This tree is also known as the shore pine, twisted pine, and contorta pine as well as black pine, scrub pine, and coast pine. The Lodgepole pine grows best between 8000 and 10,000 feet above sea level. They like to grow in well-drained, slightly acidic, sandy soils on gentle south...

37_746275a9352c8782dccf710785785fd2
2005-07-13 10:16:07

A weevil is a beetle from the Curculionoidea superfamily. There are over 60,000 species in several families, mostly in the family Curculionidae (the true weevils). They are typically small, measuring less than ¼ inch (6mm), and herbivorous. Due to the shape of their heads, weevils are commonly known as snout beetles. Weevils are destructive to crops. One example is the grain or wheat weevil (Sitophilus granarius), which damages stored grain. The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis)...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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