Quantcast
Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 9:54 EDT

Latest Curculionidae Stories

7aed0bcf8652aa33f28b1637d1ca7239
2005-08-01 18:57:05

BOSTON -- A species of beetle never before seen in North America has been discovered in a Massachusetts forest, but the Asian insect does not appear to pose an ecological threat, experts said Monday. Twenty-two beetles belonging to the Xyleborus seriatus species of ambrosia beetle were found in April in traps set by state forestry workers in Southborough, about 25 miles west of Boston. Two or three more were trapped in nearby Stow. The insects were sent to Cornell University to be studied....

2005-06-28 16:34:33

University of Nevada, Reno scientists have ended a decade-long controversy over the process by which bark beetles make pheromones: they manufacture their own monoterpenes "“ the fragrant substances plants produce and which are often used in perfumes. It had been thought that insects and other animals were incapable of making these substances. "The goal of our research is ultimately to control pheromone production," said Gary Blomquist, professor and chair of biochemistry and molecular...

9caf72671c83b8b6d97fcbc325af44981
2004-12-19 10:22:51

Folk remedy shows anti-inflammatory properties in lab tests HealthDayNews -- Your Christmas tree may be both beautiful and beneficial to your health. Finnish researchers say a group of anti-inflammatory compounds called phenolics found in the bark of Scotch pine -- a popular choice for Christmas trees -- may prove effective in fighting arthritis and pain. These compounds, which have shown promise in preliminary laboratory tests with cells, are likely found in the bark of other species of pine...


Latest Curculionidae Reference Libraries

37_746275a9352c8782dccf710785785fd2
2005-07-13 10:16:07

A weevil is a beetle from the Curculionoidea superfamily. There are over 60,000 species in several families, mostly in the family Curculionidae (the true weevils). They are typically small, measuring less than ¼ inch (6mm), and herbivorous. Due to the shape of their heads, weevils are commonly known as snout beetles. Weevils are destructive to crops. One example is the grain or wheat weevil (Sitophilus granarius), which damages stored grain. The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis)...

More Articles (1 articles) »