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Latest Current sea level rise Stories

2011-07-13 12:37:05

Fresh research into glaciers could help scientists better predict the impact of changing climates on global sea levels Fresh research into glaciers could help scientists better predict the impact of changing climates on global sea levels. Scientists have shown for the first time that the terrain beneath glaciers influences how much glacier melt contributes to fluctuations in sea levels. Researchers say the study will improve their understanding of how ice sheet movements have affected sea...

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2011-07-04 05:05:00

Sea levels could be rising faster than scientists originally believed, thanks to the warming subsurface waters that could cause more rapid melting of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, researchers from the University of Arizona are claiming. In a new study, University of Arizona Assistant Professor of Geosciences Jianjun Yin and colleagues analyzed 19 different climate models under which global warming would accelerate the melting of the world's largest ice sheets over the next two...

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2011-06-21 06:05:00

A consistent link exists between changes in global mean surface temperature and sea level, resulting in a greater rate of sea-level rise along the U.S. Atlantic coast than that of the past 2,000 years, says an international research team. "Sea-level rise is a potentially disastrous outcome of climate change, as rising temperatures melt land-based iced and warm ocean waters," says Benjamin Horton, associate professor and director of the Sea Level Research Laboratory at the University of...

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2011-06-17 08:10:00

A new survey of barrier islands published earlier this spring offers the most thorough assessment to date of the thousands of small islands that hug the coasts of the world's landmasses. The study, led by Matthew Stutz of Meredith College, Raleigh, N.C., and Orrin Pilkey of Duke University, Durham, N.C., offers new insight into how the islands form and evolve over time "“ and how they may fare as the climate changes and sea level rises. The survey is based on a global collection of...

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2011-06-11 09:20:00

Venice "“ the City of Dreams "“ may have one less nightmare to deal with following a finding that the frequency of extreme storm surge events generated by Adriatic Sea tempests could fall by about 30 percent by 2100. A team of international scientists led by CSIRO's Dr Alberto Troccoli studied atmospheric circulation in the Mediterranean region to assess climate impacts through changes in storm surge frequency in Venice "“ a World Heritage-listed city built on 117 small...

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2011-06-06 14:09:12

It is a very muddy trek from the small boat to the field site along Raccoon Creek near Bridgeport, N.J. Villanova University marine scientist Nathaniel Weston and his team are all carrying ladders and equipment as they slosh through ankle deep mud toward their experiments. "The whole reason I got into this line of research is because I like being outside, I like coastal estuaries and marsh systems, I like getting muddy, so I have fun with it," says Weston enthusiastically. With support...

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2011-06-03 09:20:00

Scientists from the U.S., U.K. and Australia have used ice-penetrating radar to create the first high- resolution topographic map of one of the last uncharted regions of Earth, the Aurora Subglacial Basin, an immense ice-buried lowland in East Antarctica larger than Texas. The map reveals some of the largest fjords or ice cut channels on Earth, providing important insights into the history of ice in Antarctica. The data will also help computer modelers improve their simulations of the past...

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2011-05-30 09:06:20

With an estimated 34,000 square miles of ice, an area about the size of Maine, Alaska's multitude of glaciers have a global impact. Anthony Arendt, an assistant research professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, has outlined the complexity and influence of Alaska glaciers in last week's issue of the journal Science. In his article, Arendt explains the importance of integrating field observations and more precise glacier simulation models. "We have used satellites...

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2011-05-23 10:40:00

A report from the Australian Climate Commission has warned that "once-a-century" coastal flooding could become much more common and that the Earth's surface is warming rapidly, reports the AFP news agency. Drawn from the most up-to-date climate science from around the world, the report said greenhouse gas emissions created by human industry was the likely culprit behind rising temperatures, warming oceans, and rising sea levels. While climate scientists from Australian science body the CSIRO,...

2011-05-16 17:14:24

The majority of seaports around the world are unprepared for the potentially damaging impacts of climate change in the coming century, according to a new Stanford University study. In a survey posed to port authorities around the world, the Stanford team found that most officials are unsure how best to protect their facilities from rising sea levels and more frequent Katrina-magnitude storms, which scientists say could be a consequence of global warming. Results from the survey are published...


Latest Current sea level rise Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.