Quantcast

Latest Current sea level rise Stories

f07ccd28d099f0e20db7fd0454d8dddb
2011-05-12 07:41:31

ESA's CryoSat team working on the Greenland ice sheet has been honored with a visit from a Dutch delegation including HRH Prince of Orange. The visit is part of a tour to learn more about climate change in polar regions and consequences for the environment. Prince Willem-Alexander's visit to Greenland was at the invitation of the World Wide Fund for Nature-Netherlands. The delegation included Johan van de Gronden, CEO of WWF-NL, Robbert Dijkgraaf, President of the Royal Dutch Academy of...

e7e8d6d4d441d5a69e0676c6982ca7dd
2011-05-03 11:40:00

According to an international report, climate change in the Arctic could raise world sea levels to 5 feet by 2100. A rise like this would threaten the coasts from Bangladesh to Florida, low-lying Pacific islands and cities from London to Shanghai.  It would also raise costs of building tsunami barriers in Japan. "The past six years (until 2010) have been the warmest period ever recorded in the Arctic," according to the Oslo-based Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP). "In...

dcc198ad9e065eca7297df112be98b281
2011-04-20 14:20:00

According to a new study, melting glaciers and ice caps on Canadian Arctic islands play a much greater role in sea level rise than scientists previously thought. There are bout 30,000 islands within the 550,000-square-mile Canadian Arctic Archipelago.  The study found that between 2004 and 2009, the region lost the equivalent of three-quarters of the water in Lake Erie. Alex Gardner, a research fellow in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences at the University of...

12310d37db0ef2cd0bc947a30b83f3021
2011-04-09 06:05:00

New forecasts on rising sea levels suggest that New York will be a big loser, while some regions, including those closer to polar regions, will win big, reports BBC News.. A 2007 report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change forecast sea levels to rise by as much as 1 foot by 2100. But that forecast was a global average. A Dutch team has now made an attempt to model all the factors leading to regional variations. And whatever the global figure turns out to be, there will be...

f0704d5a579d307fc266d11af8ecdbed1
2011-03-09 08:45:00

Ice sheets have been losing mass at an accelerated rate over the past two decades, and these changes could soon become the dominant contributor to rising global sea levels, a NASA-funded study has discovered. The results of the nearly 20-year satellite research project--the longest study ever to track changes in polar ice sheet mass--showed that ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic lost an average of 475 gigatons of combined mass annually. Each gigaton is roughly equal to 2.2 trillion...

74359fac4b9d67aa7a7125b49c7474aa1
2011-03-04 08:27:41

An international team of scientists working in the most remote parts of Antarctica have discovered that masses of ice form underneath the ice sheet instead of on top, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.Liquid water locked deep under Antarctica's coat of ice regularly thaws, and then refreezes to the bottom, creating as much as half the thickness of the ice in some places, the researchers said. "We usually think of ice sheets like cakes -- one layer at a time added...

2011-02-23 22:24:34

An assessment of coastal change over the past 150 years has found 68 percent of beaches in the New England and Mid-Atlantic region are eroding, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report released today. Scientists studied more than 650 miles of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts and found the average rate of coastal change "“ taking into account beaches that are both eroding and prograding -- was negative 1.6 feet per year.  Of those beaches eroding, the most extreme case...

3f466a18195220c1eae7e0184b6e50521
2011-02-21 10:05:00

The contribution of Greenland to global sea level change and the mapping of previously unknown basins and mountains beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet are highlighted in a new film released by Cambridge University this morning. The work of glaciologist Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, is the focus of This Icy World, the latest film in the University's Cambridge Ideas series. A frequent visitor to both the Arctic and Antarctic,...

f86c5c07dc49e62cdbe758d646fd982b1
2011-02-15 11:00:00

Rising sea levels could threaten an average of 9 percent of the land within 180 US coastal cities by 2100, according to new research led by University of Arizona scientists. The Gulf and southern Atlantic coasts will be particularly affected. The cities of Miami, New Orleans, Tampa, Fla., and Virginia Beach, Va. could lose more than 10 percent of their land area by 2100. This is the first analysis of vulnerability to sea-level rise that includes every US coastal city in the lower 48 with a...

0755fb5b33580c4a601b79e55f72d2e2
2011-02-13 08:33:46

A set of maps created by the University of Sheffield have illustrated, for the first time, how our last British ice sheet shrunk during the Ice Age. Led by Professor Chris Clark from the University´s Department of Geography, a team of experts developed the maps to understand what effect the current shrinking of ice sheets in parts of the Antarctic and Greenland will have on the speed of sea level rise. The unique maps record the pattern and speed of shrinkage of the large...


Latest Current sea level rise Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
Related