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Latest Current sea level rise Stories

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2011-03-04 08:27:41

An international team of scientists working in the most remote parts of Antarctica have discovered that masses of ice form underneath the ice sheet instead of on top, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.Liquid water locked deep under Antarctica's coat of ice regularly thaws, and then refreezes to the bottom, creating as much as half the thickness of the ice in some places, the researchers said. "We usually think of ice sheets like cakes -- one layer at a time added...

2011-02-23 22:24:34

An assessment of coastal change over the past 150 years has found 68 percent of beaches in the New England and Mid-Atlantic region are eroding, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report released today. Scientists studied more than 650 miles of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts and found the average rate of coastal change "“ taking into account beaches that are both eroding and prograding -- was negative 1.6 feet per year.  Of those beaches eroding, the most extreme case...

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2011-02-21 10:05:00

The contribution of Greenland to global sea level change and the mapping of previously unknown basins and mountains beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet are highlighted in a new film released by Cambridge University this morning. The work of glaciologist Professor Julian Dowdeswell, Director of Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, is the focus of This Icy World, the latest film in the University's Cambridge Ideas series. A frequent visitor to both the Arctic and Antarctic,...

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2011-02-15 11:00:00

Rising sea levels could threaten an average of 9 percent of the land within 180 US coastal cities by 2100, according to new research led by University of Arizona scientists. The Gulf and southern Atlantic coasts will be particularly affected. The cities of Miami, New Orleans, Tampa, Fla., and Virginia Beach, Va. could lose more than 10 percent of their land area by 2100. This is the first analysis of vulnerability to sea-level rise that includes every US coastal city in the lower 48 with a...

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2011-02-13 08:33:46

A set of maps created by the University of Sheffield have illustrated, for the first time, how our last British ice sheet shrunk during the Ice Age. Led by Professor Chris Clark from the University´s Department of Geography, a team of experts developed the maps to understand what effect the current shrinking of ice sheets in parts of the Antarctic and Greenland will have on the speed of sea level rise. The unique maps record the pattern and speed of shrinkage of the large...

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2011-01-27 09:26:45

Hotter summers may not be as catastrophic for the Greenland ice sheet as previously feared and may actually slow down the flow of glaciers, according to new research. A letter published in Nature on 27 January explains how increased melting in warmer years causes the internal drainage system of the ice sheet to 'adapt' and accommodate more melt-water, without speeding up the flow of ice toward the oceans. The findings have important implications for future assessments of global sea level...

2011-01-27 00:02:59

Changes within the seawater beneath the floating sea ice may be accelerating change in the Arctic and beyond London (PRWeb UK) January 26, 2011 A "Ëœthin blue line' of fresh water immediately beneath the Arctic sea ice may hold the key to understanding changes in ocean current s that influence the prevailing climate of Europe and the East Coast of North America. The Catlin Arctic Survey announced today that its team of polar explorers and scientists will be heading to the Arctic...

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2011-01-21 13:55:00

Scientists reported on Friday that Greenland's icesheet shed a record amount of melted snow and ice in 2010. The study found that the 2010 runoff was twice the average annual loss in Greenland over the previous three decades, surpassing a record set in 2007. According to the paper, ice melt has now topped this benchmark every year since 1996. Greenland's icesheet could drive up ocean levels by about 23 feet if it melted, drowning coastal cities around the world. No credible projections...

2011-01-21 00:00:48

High-Resolution Video, Photos Available Upon Request New York (Vocus/PRWEB) January 20, 2011 New research shows that 2010 set new records for the melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet, expected to be a major contributor to projected sea level rises in coming decades. "This past melt season was exceptional, with melting in some areas stretching up to 50 days longer than average," said Dr. Marco Tedesco, Director of the Cryosphere Processes Laboratory at the City College of New York (CCNY...

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2011-01-10 09:20:00

Global climate change could eliminate three-fourths of the alpine glaciers in Europe within the next century and add four meters to sea levels by the year 3000, according to a new study published Sunday in the online journal Nature Geoscience. The study, which was written by scientists at the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis at the University of Victoria and the University of Calgary's Department of Geography, involved the creation and analysis of a full climate model...


Latest Current sea level rise Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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