Quantcast
Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Latest Current sea level rise Stories

2012-12-06 11:54:11

On December 6, NOAA will release a technical report that estimates global mean sea level rise over the next century based on a comprehensive synthesis of existing scientific literature. The report finds that there is very high confidence (greater than 90% chance) that global mean sea level will rise at least 8 inches (0.2 meters) and no more than 6.6 feet (2 meters) by 2100, depending upon uncertainties associated with ice sheet loss and ocean warming. The actual amount of sea level change...

Ice Sheet Loss At Both Poles Is Clearly Increasing
2012-11-30 08:10:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a new study that ends 20 years of uncertainty, an international team of satellite experts have produced the most accurate assessment of ice losses from Antarctica and Greenland to date. Published in the journal Science, the landmark study shows that the melting of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets has contributed 11.1 millimeters to global sea levels since 1992, amounting to one fifth of all sea level rise over the survey...

2012-11-29 16:20:32

WASHINGTON, Nov. 29, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An international team of experts supported by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) has combined data from multiple satellites and aircraft to produce the most comprehensive and accurate assessment to date of ice sheet losses in Greenland and Antarctica and their contributions to sea level rise. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO ) In a landmark study published Thursday in the journal Science, 47 researchers...

2012-11-28 16:22:39

COLLEGE STATION, Texas, Nov. 28, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The melting rate of certain glaciers in Antarctica is unmistakably accelerating and the most direct link to global warming is in the unknown adjustment of the surrounding Southern Ocean. That leads to not only an uncertain future stability of the icy continent but also raises questions about the pace of sea level rise around the world, according to work by a Texas A&M University researcher. (Logo:...

Research Shows Sea-Level Rise Is Much Faster Than Previously Reported
2012-11-28 12:18:17

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been keeping a close eye on rising sea levels and has released several reports outlining the forecasts for the future of our world´s oceans. In its fourth assessment report, released in 2007, the IPCC estimated sea levels were rising at a rate of 0.08 inches per year based on satellite data. But new research from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Tempo...

2012-11-28 11:15:55

An enhanced approach to capturing changes on the Earth's surface via satellite could provide a more accurate account of how ice sheets, river basins and other geographic areas are changing as a result of natural and human factors. In a first application, the technique revealed sharper-than-ever details about Greenland's massive ice sheet, including that the rate at which it is melting might be accelerating more slowly than predicted. Princeton University researchers developed a...

Rising Temperatures Could Lead To Sea Levels Rising Three Feet Or More
2012-11-15 13:56:59

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A rapid response between global temperatures and ice volume/sea-level that could lead to sea-levels rising by over 3 feet have been revealed by a new study from the University of Southampton. Global ice-volume variability has been one of the main feedback mechanisms in climate change during the last few million years. This is because of the strong reflective properties of large ice sheets. Scientists reconstruct ice volume...

Anthropogenic Climate Change Leads To Melting Glaciers And Rising Sea Level
2012-11-14 15:22:41

University of Innsbruck Between 1902 and 2009, melting glaciers contributed 11 cm to sea level rise. They were therefore the most important cause of sea level rise. This is the result of a new assessment by scientists of the University of Innsbruck. They numerically modeled the changes of each of the world´s 300 000 glaciers. Until 2100, glaciers could lead to an additional 22 cm of sea level rise. Since 1900 the global sea level has risen by approximately 20 cm. Melting glaciers...

Greenland Could Be Affected By Warming Temperatures
2012-11-14 09:01:27

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There are almost as many global climate models as there are climate scientists. Even with all of these models, however, it's very difficult to pin down how warming temperatures globally will affect any specific region. A research team from The City College of New York and the University of Liege, Belgium, and supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), have made the "global local" using the output of three global models and...

Previous Predictions Of Groundwater Flooding Doubles With Future Sea Level Rise
2012-11-12 11:08:42

University of Hawaii “‘ SOEST Scientists from the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) published a study today in Nature Climate Change showing that besides marine inundation (flooding), low-lying coastal areas may also be vulnerable to "groundwater inundation," a factor largely unrecognized in earlier predictions on the effects of sea level rise (SLR). Previous research has predicted that by the end of the century, sea level may rise 1 meter. Kolja Rotzoll, Postdoctoral...


Latest Current sea level rise Reference Libraries

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

More Articles (1 articles) »