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Latest Cyclin D Stories

2011-09-22 21:31:53

Finding could be relevant to Alzheimer's disease treatment Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School have found that a common cancer protein leads a second, totally different life in normal adult brain cells: It helps regulates memory formation and may be implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Cyclin E is a well-known culprit that drives many types of solid tumors and blood cancers. The report, published online in Developmental Cell, is the first revelation that...

2011-06-09 23:33:23

Blocking cyclin D1 might help sensitize tumors to radiation Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have uncovered a new role for a key cancer protein, a finding that could pave the way for more-effective radiation treatment of a variety of tumors. Many cancers are driven in part by elevated levels of cyclin D1, which allow the cells to escape growth controls and proliferate abnormally. In the new research, reported in the June 9 issue of Nature, researchers discovered that cyclin D1 also...

2010-07-28 14:34:57

With a single stimulatory molecule, human insulin-producing beta cell replication can be sustained for at least four weeks in a mouse model of diabetes, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Diabetes, a journal of the American Diabetes Association. They also found several cocktails of molecules that drive human beta cells to replicate, as well as important differences between mouse and human beta cells that could influence how these approaches are best...

2010-07-08 14:34:16

New Queen's University research has shown that the growth of melanoma, one of the most deadly forms of skin cancer, can be slowed when a little known gene called MicroRNA 193b is added. Victor Tron, head of pathology and molecular medicine, focused on miR-193b when he discovered that it was deficient in melanoma tumors and because there were very few studies done about the gene. The miRNA-193b gene is found in people's DNA and was unknown until 10 years ago. "Our experiment was a bit of a...

2010-07-01 15:48:18

It may seem intuitive that growth and development somehow go together so that plants and animals end up with the right number of cells in all the right places. But it is only now that scientists at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy have gotten some of the first insights into how this critical coordination actually works in a plant. The answer is surprisingly simple. A well-known developmental protein called Short-root has been found to directly control the activity, in both...

2010-07-01 15:10:22

How do plants and animals end up with right number of cells in all the right places? For the first time, scientists have gained an insight into how this process is co-ordinated in plants. An international team, including Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and Duke University in the USA, have linked the process of cell division with the way cells acquire their different characteristics. A protein called Short-root, already known to play a part in determining what cells will become, was...

2010-01-19 19:37:52

A study by researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine, the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts, and Tufts Medical Center improves our current understanding of the origins of breast cancer. The researchers propose a new model for breast cell differentiation that identifies two populations of progenitor cells, one of which appears to be the cell of origin for luminal-like breast cancer, the most common form of the disease. The study, published in the January 19 issue...

2009-08-25 15:04:21

ONCOLOGY: Human breast cancer hit for six: key role for Six1 in tumor development and metastasisHeide Ford and colleagues, at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, have provided new insight into breast cancer development using mouse models and analysis of human cells, implicating the protein Six1 as central to this process.Six1, a protein that plays a central role in development, is not expressed in the majority of adult cells other than cancer cells of several types,...

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2008-09-15 18:55:00

Researchers reported on Monday that a certain gene variant may be linked to the most dangerous form of skin cancer. Scientists from the Portuguese Institute of Oncology in Porto presented their study at the Congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology in Stockholm. They discovered that people who carried a gene named cyclin D1 had an 81 percent higher risk of developing skin cancer than those who did not carry the gene. Cyclin D1 is part of the mechanism that speeds up or slows...

2008-07-14 09:00:14

Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:CYCC, NASDAQ:CYCCP) announced the publication of a study conducted by Cyclacel scientists showing synergistic activity between its investigational therapy seliciclib and multiple epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, including erlotinib (Tarceva(R)) in models of non-small cell lung cancer and the HER2 targeting agent, trastuzumab (Herceptin(R)) in models of breast cancer. These preclinical results were published in the July issue of the...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.