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Latest Cytogenetics Stories

2014-06-17 13:41:26

University of Texas at Arlington A UT Arlington research team says their study of genetic information from more than 4,000 beetle species has yielded a new theory about why some species lose their Y chromosome and others, such as humans, hang on to it. They call it the "fragile Y hypothesis." The biologists' idea is that the fate of the Y chromosome is heavily influenced by how meiosis, or the production of sperm, works in an organism. They believe the size of an area where X and Y...

2014-05-07 08:54:14

Each time a human cell divides, it must first make a copy of its 46 chromosomes to serve as an instruction manual for the new cell. Normally, this process goes off without a hitch. But from time to time, the information isn't copied and collated properly, leaving gaps or breaks that the cell has to carefully combine back together. Researchers have long recognized that some regions of the chromosome,called "fragile sites," are more prone to breakage and can be a breeding ground for human...

2014-04-29 23:14:57

The 5p- Society is joining with families around the globe that have been affected by Cri Du Chat, to send a message to the world. That message is that these individuals deserve to be recognized for what they can do versus what they cannot do. Lakewood, CA (PRWEB) April 29, 2014 May 4-10, 2014 is Cri Du Chat Syndrome Awareness Week May 5 is officially designated as Cri Du Chat Day in the United States. The 5p- Society of North America, along with support organizations from Argentina,...

First Sex Determining Genes Appeared In Mammals Some 180 Million Years Ago
2014-04-24 03:55:04

Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics This news release is available in French and German. Man or woman? Male or female? In humans and other mammals, the difference between sexes depends on one single element of the genome: the Y chromosome. It is present only in males, where the two sexual chromosomes are X and Y, whereas women have two X chromosomes. Thus, the Y is ultimately responsible for all the morphological and physiological differences between males and females. But this has not...

2014-04-18 15:41:30

Researchers propose classification system revolutionizing communication of chromosomal abnormalities for research and clinical settings When talking about genetic abnormalities at the DNA level that occur when chromosomes swap, delete or add parts, there is an evolving communication gap both in the science and medical worlds, leading to inconsistencies in clinical and research reports. Now a study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) proposes a new classification system...

2014-04-09 08:29:15

PHILADELPHIA, April 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- On April 5, 2014, the 20(th) anniversary of the death of Dr. Jerome Lejeune was marked with great celebration in Paris. Dr. Jerome Lejeune died there on April 3, 1994. To his family and "little ones" - as he always called his patients affected by Down syndrome - he was a remarkable man of science who was motivated by a profound love for those he served. He was a father of 5 who dedicated his life to his family, and to the service of his...

2014-03-31 12:10:17

Nearly half of patients with the most common form of adult leukemia are said to have normal chromosomes but appear instead to have a distinct pattern of genetic abnormalities that could better define their prognosis and treatment, researchers report. Using microarray technology that probes millions of genes within chromosomes, researchers found the unique pattern in the leukemia cells of 22 patients diagnosed with cytogenetically normal acute myelogenous leukemia, said Dr. Ravindra Kolhe,...

2014-03-27 13:07:49

Results help explain puzzling features of 'dot chromosome' In previous research, UC Berkeley scientists Beatriz Vicoso, Ph.D., and Doris Bachtrog, Ph.D., determined that genes on the so-called "dot chromosome," or fourth chromosome, of the fruit fly Drosophilia melanogaster are X-linked in three other related fly species. These and other findings revealed that the fruit fly's "dot chromosome" had descended from a differentiated X chromosome and suggests that several of the chromosome's...

2014-02-19 16:24:07

DUBLIN, Feb. 19, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/jzx9mp/molecular ) has announced the addition of the "Molecular Cytogenetics Market - Forecast to 2019" report to their offering. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769) Molecular cytogenetics refers to the study of chromosomal structures with the use of molecular techniques. The technique provides a combination of both molecular and cytological approach to research and...

Calico Cats Inspire Research Into X Chromosome Inactivation
2014-02-19 04:31:40

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Calico cats are renowned and beloved for their funky orange and black patchwork or "tortoiseshell" fur. Cat Breeds Encyclopedia reports that these felines — considered to be good luck in several countries — are 90 percent female, suggesting that the color pattern is related to the gender of the animal. New research from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), has further linked this unique color pattern to X chromosome...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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