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Latest Cytogenetics Stories

2011-04-21 23:03:29

A study of DNA rearrangements in roundworm chromosomes may offer new insight into large-scale genome duplications that occur in developing tumors. A report of the research led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine scientists was published in the April 22 online edition of the journal Science. The study focused on telomeres, a region of repetitive DNA sequence that protects the ends of chromosomes from deterioration or from fusing with other chromosomes. In many...

2011-04-14 21:03:08

Egg cells failing to properly arrange chromosomes Washington State University researchers have confirmed a critical step in cell division that results in age-related miscarriages and birth defects, including Down syndrome. Writing in the upcoming issue of the journal "Current Biology," the researchers say they recreated the conditions in which an egg cell will continue to undergo cell division without properly arranging its chromosomes, creating offspring with aneuploidy, or an abnormal...

2011-04-11 15:40:30

The evolution and diversification of the more than 300,000 living species of flowering plants may have been "jump started" much earlier than previously calculated, a new study indicates. According to Claude dePamphilis, a professor of biology at Penn State University and the lead author of the study, which includes scientists at six universities, two major upheavals in the plant genome occurred hundreds of millions of years ago -- nearly 200 million years earlier than the events that other...

2011-04-08 09:21:00

Four Mexican Laboratories Selected for Cytogenetics Standardization Pilot Project MEXICO CITY, April 8, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A workshop being held today will serve as the launch of a unique project that unites the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the Agrupacion Mexicana para el Estudio de la Hematologia (AMEH), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in pursuit of a common goal: improving the care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The key to successfully...

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2011-03-03 09:55:00

Vive le difference? Not at the level of DNA. Men must increase gene expression on their lone X-chromosome to match the two X's possessed by women. A new study explains just how men manage to do that. What makes a man? His clothes? His car? His choice of scotch? The real answer, says Brown University biologist Erica Larschan, is the newly understood activity of a protein complex that, like a genetic power tool, gives enzymes on the X-chromosome an extra boost to increase gene expression. The...

2011-03-03 07:00:00

NEW HAVEN, Conn., March 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The launch of a new, non-invasive test for the identification of Turner syndrome (TS) was announced today by JS Genetics. The test, XCAT-TS, is a simple cheek swab that identifies girls with Turner syndrome. Until now, Turner syndrome could only be diagnosed with a Karyotype, an invasive test that requires blood from the patient. The results of the XCAT-TS validation study were published in the February 2011 issue of Journal of Clinical...

2011-02-16 17:39:54

As a child grows, a short stature is not usually cause for concern, but it is often the only sign of a condition called Turner syndrome. Prevalent in girls, Turner syndrome is a genetic defect that short-circuits normal growth and leads to cardiac and renal problems. It is not commonly detected until age 10 or older when a youngster's unusually short height raises suspicions. This lag before diagnosis of the condition can delay the start of growth hormone therapy, which can help in achieving...

2011-02-10 14:04:32

According to new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology In 1980 in the United States, approximately 4.5% of all pregnant women were of advanced maternal age. By 2007 that figure had increased to 14%. Women over 35 are at increased risk of giving birth to babies with trisomy 21. In a study published online today in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG), researchers from the Sequenom Center for Molecular Medicine confirmed that DNA sequencing...

2011-02-03 17:53:27

The genes that make up the human genome were mapped by HUGO, the Human Genome Organization, and published in 2001. Now the project is expanding into the HUPO, the Human Proteome Organization. Within the framework of this organization, many hundreds of researchers around the world will work together to identify the proteins that the different genes give rise to in the human body. "The 'proteome', the set of all human proteins, is significantly more complicated than the genome. There are over...

2011-01-24 15:37:27

The sight of a researcher sitting at a microscope for hours, painstakingly searching for the right cells, may soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new software created by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany. Presented today in Nature Methods, the novel computer programme can rapidly learn what the scientist is looking for and then takes over this laborious and time-consuming task, automatically performing complex microscopy experiments when...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'