Quantcast

Latest Cytogenetics Stories

2011-02-03 17:53:27

The genes that make up the human genome were mapped by HUGO, the Human Genome Organization, and published in 2001. Now the project is expanding into the HUPO, the Human Proteome Organization. Within the framework of this organization, many hundreds of researchers around the world will work together to identify the proteins that the different genes give rise to in the human body. "The 'proteome', the set of all human proteins, is significantly more complicated than the genome. There are over...

2011-01-24 15:37:27

The sight of a researcher sitting at a microscope for hours, painstakingly searching for the right cells, may soon be a thing of the past, thanks to new software created by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany. Presented today in Nature Methods, the novel computer programme can rapidly learn what the scientist is looking for and then takes over this laborious and time-consuming task, automatically performing complex microscopy experiments when...

9b425778ce457868d7a7b81fbf8563d8
2011-01-12 12:50:00

Research published on Tuesday states that DNA in a pregnant woman's blood can reliably show whether her fetus has Down's syndrome, which can reduce the need for invasive testing procedures like amniocentesis. Down's syndrome, a major developmental disorder also known as trisomy 21, occurs in around one in every 800 live births. Pre-natal diagnosis mainly entails sampling fluid from the amniotic sac enveloping the fetus.  Another technique is called chorionic villus sampling, and it...

2011-01-06 16:28:01

Most of the time cancer seems to creep up gradually over time; cells become premalignant, then increasingly abnormal before they become cancerous. But sometimes cancers seem to pop up as if out of nowhere. Now, researchers reporting in the January 7th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, have new evidence to explain how that can happen. Based on the DNA sequences of multiple cancer samples of various types, they show that cancer can arise suddenly in the aftermath of one-off...

286b1009b12ba6bff829f787e9aba20e1
2010-12-22 13:52:23

University of Adelaide researchers are a step closer to unraveling the mysteries of human sexual development, following genetic studies that show male mice can be created without a Y chromosome "“ through the activation of an ancient brain gene. Males usually have one Y chromosome and one X chromosome, while females have two X chromosomes. A single gene on the Y, called SRY, triggers testes development in the early embryo, and once these begin to form, the rest of the embryo also...

2010-12-02 22:03:12

Gene is linked to so-called 'intersex' families The Y chromosome is supposed to genetically seal a fetus's fate in terms of gender. Males have one X and one Y chromosome, while females have two X chromosomes. Yet, in some families a child is born with an X and Y chromosome and develops physically as a female, although she may not menstruate, and her brothers and male cousins may have underdeveloped or ambiguous genitalia. Now an international team led by Harry Ostrer, MD, director of the...

2010-12-02 21:37:54

A variety of genetic factors are involved in sex determination. If something goes wrong with one of these factors, people who have a chromosome set that predicts they will be of one sex may develop as the other sex or have traits on the spectrum between the two sexes. There can be emotional and social stress associated with disorders of sex determination (DSD), and in many cases, infertility is an additional problem. Several genetic alterations that cause DSDs have been identified, and work...

2010-11-25 22:08:47

Accurate gene distribution during cell division depends on stable set-up Scientists have discovered an amazingly simple way that cells stabilize their machinery for forcing apart chromosomes. Their findings are reported Nov. 25 in Nature. When a cell gets ready to split into new cells, this stable set-up permits its genetic material to be separated and distributed accurately. Otherwise, problem cells "“ like cancer cells"” arise. The human body contains more than a trillion cells,...

f594ed78e459ad0081e1bdcfbd2d4fd91
2010-11-03 14:40:43

Physical defects in plants can be predicted based on chromosome imbalances, a finding that may shed light on how the addition or deletion of genes and the organization of the genome affects organisms, according to a study involving a Purdue University researcher. The findings identify easily measured characteristics that vary with imbalances of specific chromosomes, said Brian Dilkes, a Purdue assistant professor of horticulture. Understanding why and how those imbalances result in certain...

2010-10-14 00:55:00

A team led by a scientist at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has discovered a regulatory protein that influences where genetic material gets swapped between maternal and paternal chromosomes during the process of creating eggs and sperm. The findings, which shed light on the roots of chromosomal errors and gene diversity, appear in tomorrow's issue of Nature. Most cells contain 46 chromosomes, half coming from each parent. But eggs and sperm, known as germ cells, have half as...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
Related