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Latest Cytogenetics Stories

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2010-06-25 10:19:58

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, and the Max-Planck Institute of Immunobiology Freiburg have identified a novel protein complex that regulates around 4000 genes in the fruit fly Drosophila and likely plays an important role in mammals, too. Published today in Molecular Cell, their findings explain how another regulatory protein can lead a double life. "This new complex seems to be one of the major regulatory complexes both in Drosophila...

2010-06-18 14:56:41

Y chromosome linked to fatal aneurysm Research currently being undertaken at the University of Leicester may identify reasons underlying an increased risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) in men. In her doctoral study, Cardiovascular Sciences student Lisa Bloomer is looking into the causes of the male predominance of AAA, with a particular emphasis on genetic basis of the disease. Preliminary results from the study will be showcased at the University of Leicester's Festival of Postgraduate...

2010-05-14 11:19:38

An international consortium of genetics experts has issued a consensus statement recommending chromosomal microarray (CMA) as the new standard practice for genetic evaluation of children with unexplained developmental delay, autism or birth defects. The statement and a related research review are published in the May 14, 2010 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. "CMA gives us a huge improvement in the diagnostic yield of genetic testing and in our ability to counsel parents about...

2010-05-14 10:00:12

Oxygen levels in the lab can permanently alter human embryonic stem (ES) cells, specifically inducing X chromosome inactivation in female cells, according to Whitehead Institute researchers. Human ES cells have been routinely created and maintained at atmospheric levels of oxygen, which is about 20%. Cells in the body are usually exposed to only 1-9% oxygen. "When human ES cells are isolated at 20% oxygen, they are stressed and they inactivate one X chromosome in female cells," says Founding...

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2010-04-29 14:55:11

Jumping Elements, Some of Which Cause Genetic Diseases, Become Incorporated in the Genome at Different Stages of Human Development The density of transposable (jumping) elements between sex chromosomes in primates may have important consequences for the studies of human genetic diseases, say Penn State University researchers.  Erika Kvikstad, a 2009 Penn State Ph.D. graduate in genetics, and Kateryna Makova, an associate professor of biology at Penn State, used a statistical regression...

2010-03-24 16:50:27

Offspring with genes from one parent A reliable method for producing plants that carry genetic material from only one of their parents has been discovered by plant biologists at UC Davis. The technique, to be published March 25 in the journal Nature, could dramatically speed up the breeding of crop plants for desirable traits. The discovery came out of a chance observation in the lab that could easily have been written off as an error. "We were doing completely 'blue skies' research, and we...

2010-03-16 16:00:02

Male mice born with female sex chromosomes experience hypertension seen in postmenopausal women Washington, DC "“ Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) have determined that something in female sex chromosomes appears to trigger a rise in blood pressure after the onset of menopause. This finding challenges the current belief that sex hormones are largely responsible for regulating blood pressure. Their work, reported online Monday in Hypertension, is the first of its...

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2010-03-15 08:55:00

In largest study to date, chromosomal microarray analysis picks up more abnormalities than current tests A large study from Children's Hospital Boston and the Boston-based Autism Consortium finds that a genetic test that samples the entire genome, known as chromosomal microarray analysis, has about three times the detection rate for genetic changes related to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than standard tests. Publishing in the April issue of Pediatrics (and online March 15), the authors...

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2010-02-01 08:48:38

Cells missegregate a chromosome approximately once every hundred divisions. But don't be too alarmed: new research in the Journal of Cell Biology shows that the tumor suppressor p53 limits the growth of cells with incorrect numbers of chromosomes and prevents their progression toward cancer. The study appears online February 1. Tumor cells tend to missegregate chromosomes at a particularly high frequency (a condition known as chromosomal instability, or CIN), which is probably why they are...

2010-01-14 12:39:47

Chromosomes move faster than we first thought. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal, Genome Biology, details new findings about the way chromosomes move around the nucleus when leaving the proliferative stage of the cell cycle and entering quiescence "“ and the unexpected speed at which they move. Researchers from Brunel University's Institute for Cancer Genetics and Pharmacogenomics have been trying to understand how human chromosomes occupy different territories...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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