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Latest Cytosis Stories

2013-04-30 13:57:08

NIH-funded study reveals protein, fatty molecules and cellular energy work together during endocytosis Cells ingest proteins and engulf bacteria by a gymnastic, shape-shifting process called endocytosis. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health revealed how a key protein, dynamin, drives the action. Endocytosis lets cells absorb nutrients, import growth factors, prevent infections and accomplish many other vital tasks. Yet, despite decades of research, scientists don't fully...

2012-08-04 02:07:05

3D movie at ℠ultraresolution´ shows how cell´s machinery bends membrane inwards Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have combined the power of two kinds of microscope to produce a 3-dimensional movie of how cells ℠swallow´ nutrients and other molecules by engulfing them. The study, published today in Cell, is the first to follow changes in the shape of the cell´s membrane and track proteins thought to...

2011-09-20 13:41:22

Dr. Katja Fälber and Professor Oliver Daumke, structural biologists at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch, together with researchers from Freie Universität (FU) Berlin, have determined the molecular structure of dynamin, a ℠wire-puller´ that mediates nutrient uptake into the cell. Since pathogens such as HIV can also enter the body´s cells in this way, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms...

2011-09-01 16:40:08

Just as we must take out the trash to keep our homes clean and safe, it is essential that our cells have mechanisms for dealing with wastes and worn-out proteins. When these processes are not working properly, unwanted debris builds up in the cell and creates a toxic environment. Now, a new study published by Cell Press on September 1st in the journal Developmental Cell describes a master regulator of the intracellular recycling and waste removal process and suggests an alternative strategy...

2010-04-29 08:44:54

The findings may lead to better methods to deliver drugs A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has discovered the structure of a protein that pinches off tiny pouches from cells' outer membranes. Cells use these pouches, or vesicles, to carry nutrients and other essential substances, but many medicines also hitch a ride inside them. The structure of the protein, called dynamin, is helping to answer many longstanding questions about...

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2010-03-05 10:31:37

Max Planck scientists develop new strategy to play major role in research on human diseases Cells may not have a mouth, but they still need to ingest substances from the external environment. If this process - known as endocytosis - is affected, it can lead to infectious diseases or cardio-vascular diseases, cancer, Huntington's and diabetes. In cooperation with the Center for Information Services and High Performance Computing (ZIH) at the Dresden University of Technology, scientists from...

2009-12-02 19:20:52

The transmission of information from one neuron to the next is an unseen intricate ballet. Tiny vesicles "“ bubbles containing the chemical neurotransmitters that make information exchange possible"”travel to the tip of neurons (synapses), where they fuse with the cell's membrane in a process called exocytosis. The extra membrane is then captured in a process called endocytosis and recycled to form a new vesicle to enable the next cycle of release. The two processes, exocytosis...

2009-09-03 15:29:30

As part of the intricate ballet of synaptic transmission from one neuron to the next, tiny vesicles "“ bubbles containing the chemical neurotransmitters that make information exchange possible"”travel to the tip of neurons (synapses), where they fuse with the cell's membrane (a process called exocytosis). The extra membrane is then captured in a process called endocytosis and recycled to form a new vesicle to enable the next cycle of release. Most important, exocytosis must be...

2009-08-20 11:55:00

Success in soccer sometimes comes with "bending it like Beckham." Success in cellular fusion "” as occurs at the moment of conception and when nerve cells exchange neurotransmitters "” requires that a membrane be bent before the merging process can begin, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have shown.The scientists offer the first concrete evidence that a protein called synaptotagmin plays a critical role in initiating fusion by bending a section of a target membrane. The...

2009-07-29 14:31:00

Recycling is a critical component in the process of transmitting information from one neuron to the next, and a large protein called Tweek plays a critical role, said an international consortium of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine (www.bcm.edu) in a report in the current issue of the journal Neuron.Fruit flies that lack the protein, named for the over-caffeinated character in the cartoon South Park, shake in a hyperactive manner, said Dr. Hugo Bellen, professor of molecular and...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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