Quantcast
Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Latest Cytoskeleton Stories

2014-03-19 16:21:00

DUBLIN, Mar. 19, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/t2433z/troponin_i_cas ) has announced the addition of the "Troponin I (CAS 77108-40-8) Market Research Report" report to their offering. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769) Troponin I (CAS 77108-40-8) Market Research Report presents comprehensive data on troponin I markets globally and regionally (Europe, Asia, North America etc.) The Troponin I (CAS 77108-40-8)...

2014-02-18 14:09:05

Researchers from Warwick Medical School have discovered the key role of a protein in shutting down endocytosis during mitosis, answering a question that has evaded scientists for half a century. The study, published today in the journal eLife, is the first to outline the role of actin, a protein, in shutting down clathrin-dependent endocytosis during mitosis. Endocytosis is the process by which cells absorb molecules that are too large to pass through the plasma membrane, such as...

2014-01-27 13:40:43

Researchers from Warwick Medical School have discovered a critical point of failure in the microscopic transport system that operates inside every cell in the human body. The study, published today in Nature Communications, explains how this tiny 'railway' system is a key target for cancer drugs and, as such, how this new discovery reveals how better drugs might be made. The tracks of this so called 'railway' are tiny tubes, called microtubules, 1000 times thinner than a human hair. The...

2014-01-02 10:18:09

New research by scientists at the University of Exeter has shown that cells demonstrate remarkable flexibility and versatility when it comes to how they divide - a finding with potential links to the underlying causes of many cancers. The study, published today in Developmental Cell, describes a number of routes to the formation of a microtubule spindle – the tracks along which DNA moves when a cell divides in order to make two genetically identical cells. In order to understand the...

Researchers Help Develop A Dynamic Model Of Tissue Failure
2013-12-12 17:45:57

University of Pennsylvania The idea of growing replacement tissue to repair an organ, or to swap it out for an entirely new one, is rapidly transitioning from science fiction to fact. Tissue engineering techniques are improving in their ability to generate three-dimensional masses of cells and provide them with vascular systems for keeping them alive, but a more mathematically rigorous approach for designing these tissues is still needed. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania,...

2013-11-29 00:20:06

Tokyo, Nov 29, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - Researchers at Waseda University in Japan have identified key information to help explain the formation of the "spindle apparatus", a structure required for cell division. Their findings shed light on the mechanisms behind "self-organization" - an essential characteristic of biological structures.Organisms are composed of a variety of structures including muscles, internal organs, and brains, all of which are created through a process known as...

2013-11-26 08:27:53

SYDNEY, Nov. 26, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Novogen Limited (ASX: symbol NRT; Nasdaq: symbol NVGN) today announced the filing of a family of provisional patents in the US covering anti-tropomyosin (ATM) drug technology. ATM drugs represent an entirely novel approach to anti-cancer therapy, blocking the ability of cancer cells to divide and doing so in a highly cancer-specific way. Based on their action, ATMs belong to a class of anti-cancer drug known as anti-mitotics. Current anti-mitotic...

2013-11-25 04:20:04

Tokyo, Nov 25, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - Researchers at Waseda University in Japan have for the first time directly observed the "molecular motor", called Xkid, that plays a critical role in facilitating the proper alignment of chromosomes during cell division. Their findings are expected to contribute greatly to elucidating the molecular mechanisms of chromosome segregation, a key aspect of the development of certain medical disorders including cancer and birth defects.A human being begins as...

2013-10-21 13:32:23

Clarified role of signal-relay proteins may help explain spread of cancer Cell biologists at The Johns Hopkins University have teased apart two integral components of the machinery that causes cells to move. Their discovery shows that cellular projections, which act as hands to help a cell "crawl," are apparently always initiated by a network of message-relaying proteins inside the cell. It was already known that in directional movement, the network is activated by sensor proteins on the...

Molecular Muscles Inside Cells Help Them Sense, Respond To Their Environments
2013-10-21 07:27:59

Johns Hopkins Medicine Johns Hopkins researchers used suction to learn that individual "molecular muscles" within cells respond to different types of force, a finding that may explain how cells "feel" the environment and appropriately adapt their shapes and activities. A summary of the discovery, published online Oct. 20 in the journal Nature Materials, specifically sheds light on how forces outside of cells are translated into internal signals. A computer model the researchers...