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Latest Cytoskeleton Stories

2010-01-27 08:00:00

MISSISSAUGA, Ontario, Jan. 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- CardioGenics Holdings Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: CGNH), a developer of technology and products targeting the in-vitro diagnostics segment of the Point-Of-Care (POC) diagnostic market, announced today that it has completed the design of the self-metering cartridge for its POC diagnostic device, the QL Care Analyzer. The company has also filed a patent application regarding the self-metering cartridge. Dr. Yahia Gawad, CEO of...

2010-01-25 15:00:43

Crystals resemble some biological structures; finding opens door to new technologies X-rays can do a lot of useful things -- detect broken bones, tumors and dental cavities, analyze atoms in diverse materials and screen luggage at airports -- but who knew they could cause crystals to form? A team of Northwestern University researchers has discovered that X-rays can trigger the formation of a new type of crystal: charged cylindrical filaments ordered like a bundle of pencils experiencing...

2010-01-14 12:39:47

Chromosomes move faster than we first thought. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal, Genome Biology, details new findings about the way chromosomes move around the nucleus when leaving the proliferative stage of the cell cycle and entering quiescence "“ and the unexpected speed at which they move. Researchers from Brunel University's Institute for Cancer Genetics and Pharmacogenomics have been trying to understand how human chromosomes occupy different territories...

2010-01-11 08:00:00

NOVATO, Calif., Jan. 11 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. (Nasdaq: BMRN) announced today that the first subject has initiated treatment in the Phase 1 clinical study of BMN 195, a small molecule utrophin upregulator, for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrohpy (DMD). Initial top-line results are expected in the third quarter of 2010. "Duchenne muscular dystrophy represents a serious unmet medical need affecting approximately 40,000 patients in the developed world,...

2009-12-22 13:21:11

Cancer may spread throughout the human body when malignant cells travel in the blood stream. But it may be possible to slow or even stop those cells from spreading by altering their structure, according to a recent investigation led by a Texas A&M University researcher. The team "“ assembled by Gonzalo Rivera, an assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology in the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, and scientists...

2009-12-17 16:57:01

University of Oregon-made technique is putting new light on machinery driving intracellular transport Using new technology developed in his University of Oregon lab, chemist Andrew H. Marcus and his doctoral student Eric N. Senning have captured what they describe as well-orchestrated, actin-driven, mitochondrial movement within a single cell. That movement -- documented in a paper appearing online the week of Dec. 14-18 ahead of regular publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy...

2009-12-17 14:41:02

HZI researchers redefine the invasion mechanism of Salmonella "Based on our data, the molecular mechanism of infection employed by Salmonella has to be revised," says Klemens Rottner, head of the HZI research group "Cytoskeleton Dynamics". The group's results have now been published in the current issue of the scientific journal "Cellular Microbiology". Salmonella are highly adaptive bacteria. They can live in the presence and absence of oxygen and thus propagate in the gut. The ingestion by...

2009-12-04 14:17:53

Humans and mice have previously unknown and potentially critical differences in one of the genes responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Biology have found that two major features of a key DMD gene are present in most mammals, including humans, but are specifically absent in mice and rats, calling into question the use of the mouse as the principal model animal for studying DMD. Roland Roberts led a team of researchers from King\'s...

2009-12-02 13:00:59

It turns out that wearing a cap is good for you, at least if you are a mammal cell. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center have shown that in healthy cells, a bundled "cap" of thread-like fibers holds the cell's nucleus, its genetic storehouse, in its proper place. Understanding this cap's influence on cell and nuclear shape, the researchers say, could provide clues to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer, muscular dystrophy and the...

2009-11-30 15:23:03

In the December 2009 issue of the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org), Moss et al. report a comprehensive investigation employing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the {gamma}-amino acid (GABA) transporter GAT1, a member of the family that includes transporters for neurotransmitters dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT), norepinephrine (NET) and glycine (GlyT). The investigators created a large panel of novel mouse GAT1 transporters tagged with cyan or yellow...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.