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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Latest Cytoskeleton Stories

2009-06-12 07:33:17

New research shows that muscle atrophy is a much more ordered and deliberate process than previously thought. During atrophy, which can occur when the body is weak from a disease such as cancer or AIDS, the body cannibalizes itself and breaks down muscle proteins to liberate amino acids. According to a new study, scientists have learned that a specific enzyme selectively degrades the thick filaments in the muscle but leaves the thin filaments alone. This allows muscles to remain muscles and...

2009-06-08 11:36:41

During desperate times, such as fasting, or muscle wasting that afflicts cancer or AIDS patients, the body cannibalizes itself, atrophying and breaking down skeletal muscle proteins to liberate amino acids. In a new study published online June 8 and in the June 15, 2009 print issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org), Shenhav Cohen, Alfred Goldberg, and colleagues show that muscle atrophy is a more ordered process than was previously thought. These researchers find evidence that...

2009-05-27 16:09:19

U.S. medical scientists say they've developed a new therapy for Duchenne musclar dystrophy, a fatal disease and the most common form of MD in children. Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School, using a mouse model, said they were able to substitute for the missing protein dystrophin, which forms a key part of the framework that holds muscle tissue together. The scientists injected dystrophic mice with a protein called utrophin -- a close relative of dystrophin -- that was...

2009-05-27 08:29:28

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School have discovered a new therapy that shows potential to treat people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a fatal disease and the most common form of muscular dystrophy in children.In the mouse model, researchers were able to substitute for the missing protein "“ dystrophin, which forms a key part of the framework that holds muscle tissue together "“ that results in the disease, effectively repairing weakened muscle...

2009-05-20 07:49:20

A protein vital for correct chloroplast division in plants is able to take on a similar role in bacterial cells, according to research published today in the open access journal BMC Microbiology. The Arabidopsis thaliana Min protein (AtMinD) localizes in E. coli cells' polar regions keeping cell division at its correct central location, yet unlike its E. coli homologue, AtMinD does not oscillate. Making certain that E. coli cells divide in the centre is down to Min proteins (MinC, D and E)....

2009-05-02 07:43:40

Researchers move a step closer to using virus particles as drug 'delivery' agents In a study published in May 2009 issue of PLoS Pathogens, Manchester and her colleagues show that CPMV interacts with the mammalian protein vimentin "” an interaction that scientists can now explore with the idea of using the virus to deliver "cargo," such as drugs, to tumors or other diseased tissues. "Vimentin was not at all a likely suspect," says Kris Koudelka, a postdoctoral fellow in the Manchester...

2009-03-31 08:10:31

U.S. cancer researchers say they've identified a molecule known as protein kinase D1 that is key to enabling a tumor cell to metastasize. Mayo Clinic scientists in Florida say the finding may lead to a technique that can stop cancer from spreading elsewhere in the body -- the process that most often leads to death. The researchers, led by cancer biologist Peter Storz, found that if PKD1 is active, tumor cells cannot move, a finding they say explains why PKD1 is silenced in some invasive...

2009-03-05 08:03:02

Researchers at the University of Leeds have made a significant step forward in understanding the causes of some forms of deafness.The Leeds team has discovered that the myosin 7 motor protein - found in the tiny hairs of the inner ear that pick up sound - moves and works in a different way from many other myosins.Dr Michelle Peckham from the University of Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences says: "We're really excited by this discovery as it could lead to new insights into certain forms of...

2009-02-27 13:31:32

Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the United States, occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, bony or fatty tissue and loses function. While scientists have identified one protein, dystrophin, as an important piece to curing the disease, another part of the mystery has eluded scientists for the past 14 years. Now, one University of Missouri scientist and his team have identified the location of the genetic material responsible for a molecular...

2009-02-27 00:40:20

A University of Missouri team of scientists identified the location of the genetic material vital to curing muscular dystrophy. Dongsheng Duan said Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which predominantly affects males, is the most common type of muscular dystrophy. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a gene mutation that disrupts the production of dystrophin. Absence of dystrophin starts a chain reaction that eventually leads to muscle cell degeneration and death. A previous study by Duan...