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Latest Cytoskeleton Stories

9ef6118a4d9055f6ef94e106114bf03d1
2009-02-09 07:23:24

The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong, diseases such as cancer can arise. Scientists have tried for years to...

2009-02-05 14:50:30

An international team of scientists led by the University of Leeds has shed new light on the little-understood motor protein called dynein, thought to be involved in progressive neurological disorders such as motor neurone disease. Researchers from the University's Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and from the University of Tokyo have for the first time identified key elements of dynein's structure, and the winch-like mechanism by which it moves. The research "“ funded by...

2009-02-03 17:03:02

A delay in traffic may cause a headache, but a delay in the nervous system can cause much more. University of Missouri researchers have uncovered clues identifying which proteins are involved in the development of the nervous system and found that the proteins previously thought to play a significant role, in fact, do not. Understanding how the nervous system develops will give researchers a better understanding of neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth...

2009-01-14 06:18:27

A protein that was first identified for playing a key role in regulating normal heart rhythms also appears to be significant in helping muscle cells survive the forces of muscle contraction. The clue was a laboratory mouse that seemed to have a form of muscular dystrophy. A group of proteins called ankyrins, or anchor proteins, were first discovered in human red blood cells by Vann Bennett, M.D. a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and James B. Duke Professor of Cell Biology,...

0af5972f671dfb0d8f656ed736c7b1de1
2009-01-12 10:34:03

Perturbation of lamin B1"“Oct-1 interactions can make cells more vulnerable to oxidative stress and might contribute to the aging process A large fraction of the transcription factor Oct-1 is associated with the inner nuclear envelope, but how and why it is retained there was unknown. As for how, Malhas et al. show"”in the January 12, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology"”that Oct-1 binds to lamin B1, a prominent intermediate filament that lines the nuclear envelope,...

6be016993c239b8653314df00e690f17
2009-01-05 10:28:03

Possible mechanism of muscle denervation in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Mutations in the nuclear intermediate filament lamin A/C (LMNA) gene are associated with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, but cause the disease by unknown mechanisms. M©jat et al. show that one mechanism involves the disruption of neuromuscular junctions. The study will appear online on Monday, January 5, 2009 and in the January 12, 2009 print issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. Muscle fiber cells contain...

d1c0bd59c69804e522f308cc1a39487e1
2008-12-09 10:19:28

Researchers from the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a key step required for cell division in a study that could help improve therapies to treat cancer. Their work describing the mechanism of the contractile ring "“ a structure that pinches the mother cell into two daughter cells "“ has been published in the December 5 issue of the journal Science. The division of one cell into two is accomplished...

c69d551e61ab3d5c23dceb68bd67f44a1
2008-11-25 11:40:00

Flip open any biology textbook and you're bound to see a complicated diagram of the inner workings of a cell, with its internal scaffolding, the  cytoskeleton, and how it maintains a cell's shape. Yet the fundamental question remains, which came first: the shape, or the skeleton?Now a research team led by Phong Tran, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has the answer: Both.The findings, published online this...

2008-10-23 18:00:25

Cytokinetics, Incorporated (NASDAQ: CYTK) announced today that it is scheduled to report third quarter results on Thursday, October 30, 2008 at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Following the announcement, Cytokinetics' senior management will host a conference call at 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time to discuss operational and financial results and the company's outlook for the future. The conference call will be simultaneously webcast and can be accessed in the Investor Relations section of Cytokinetics'...

2008-10-15 09:00:47

AVI BioPharma has announced that the European Medicines Agency Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products adopted a positive opinion recommending orphan medicinal product designation for AVI-4658 to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The company believes the positive opinion of the Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products (COMP) will serve as the scientific basis for the European Commission to issue a EU orphan designation pursuant to Regulation (ED) 141/2000. Additionally, AVI BioPharma...