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Latest Cytoskeleton Stories

2009-05-02 07:43:40

Researchers move a step closer to using virus particles as drug 'delivery' agents In a study published in May 2009 issue of PLoS Pathogens, Manchester and her colleagues show that CPMV interacts with the mammalian protein vimentin "” an interaction that scientists can now explore with the idea of using the virus to deliver "cargo," such as drugs, to tumors or other diseased tissues. "Vimentin was not at all a likely suspect," says Kris Koudelka, a postdoctoral fellow in the Manchester...

2009-03-31 08:10:31

U.S. cancer researchers say they've identified a molecule known as protein kinase D1 that is key to enabling a tumor cell to metastasize. Mayo Clinic scientists in Florida say the finding may lead to a technique that can stop cancer from spreading elsewhere in the body -- the process that most often leads to death. The researchers, led by cancer biologist Peter Storz, found that if PKD1 is active, tumor cells cannot move, a finding they say explains why PKD1 is silenced in some invasive...

2009-03-05 08:03:02

Researchers at the University of Leeds have made a significant step forward in understanding the causes of some forms of deafness.The Leeds team has discovered that the myosin 7 motor protein - found in the tiny hairs of the inner ear that pick up sound - moves and works in a different way from many other myosins.Dr Michelle Peckham from the University of Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences says: "We're really excited by this discovery as it could lead to new insights into certain forms of...

2009-02-27 13:31:32

Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the United States, occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, bony or fatty tissue and loses function. While scientists have identified one protein, dystrophin, as an important piece to curing the disease, another part of the mystery has eluded scientists for the past 14 years. Now, one University of Missouri scientist and his team have identified the location of the genetic material responsible for a molecular...

2009-02-27 00:40:20

A University of Missouri team of scientists identified the location of the genetic material vital to curing muscular dystrophy. Dongsheng Duan said Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which predominantly affects males, is the most common type of muscular dystrophy. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a gene mutation that disrupts the production of dystrophin. Absence of dystrophin starts a chain reaction that eventually leads to muscle cell degeneration and death. A previous study by Duan...

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2009-02-09 07:23:24

The last step of the cell cycle is the brief but spectacularly dynamic and complicated mitosis phase, which leads to the duplication of one mother cell into two daughter cells. In mitosis, the chromosomes condense and the nucleus breaks down. Fibrous structures called spindles form, which then move the chromosomal material toward opposite ends of a cell and help partition other cell contents. If something goes wrong, diseases such as cancer can arise. Scientists have tried for years to...

2009-02-05 14:50:30

An international team of scientists led by the University of Leeds has shed new light on the little-understood motor protein called dynein, thought to be involved in progressive neurological disorders such as motor neurone disease. Researchers from the University's Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and from the University of Tokyo have for the first time identified key elements of dynein's structure, and the winch-like mechanism by which it moves. The research "“ funded by...

2009-02-03 17:03:02

A delay in traffic may cause a headache, but a delay in the nervous system can cause much more. University of Missouri researchers have uncovered clues identifying which proteins are involved in the development of the nervous system and found that the proteins previously thought to play a significant role, in fact, do not. Understanding how the nervous system develops will give researchers a better understanding of neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth...

2009-01-14 06:18:27

A protein that was first identified for playing a key role in regulating normal heart rhythms also appears to be significant in helping muscle cells survive the forces of muscle contraction. The clue was a laboratory mouse that seemed to have a form of muscular dystrophy. A group of proteins called ankyrins, or anchor proteins, were first discovered in human red blood cells by Vann Bennett, M.D. a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and James B. Duke Professor of Cell Biology,...

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2009-01-12 10:34:03

Perturbation of lamin B1"“Oct-1 interactions can make cells more vulnerable to oxidative stress and might contribute to the aging process A large fraction of the transcription factor Oct-1 is associated with the inner nuclear envelope, but how and why it is retained there was unknown. As for how, Malhas et al. show"”in the January 12, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology"”that Oct-1 binds to lamin B1, a prominent intermediate filament that lines the nuclear envelope,...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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