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Latest Daniel Geschwind Stories

2012-06-21 21:08:20

Findings could lead to future therapeutic targets UCLA researchers have combined two tools — gene expression and the use of peripheral blood -- to expand scientists' arsenal of methods for pinpointing genes that play a role in autism. Published in the June 21 online edition of the American Journal of Human Genetics, the findings could help scientists zero in on genes that offer future therapeutic targets for the disorder. "Technological advances now allow us to rapidly sequence...

2011-10-03 05:48:31

By Alicia Rose DelGallo, Ivanhoe Health Correspondent (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Mice with a single defective gene are showing striking parallels to humans with autism. According to a study published in the September 30th issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, the mouse model offers several promising discoveries. The study involved developing mice lacking CNTNAP2, a rare variant of the gene that has been shown to cause a form of autism known as cortical dysplasia-focal epilepsy syndrome...

2011-09-29 22:51:52

Mice with a defective version of a single gene show behaviors and symptoms that are remarkably similar to characteristics observed in humans with autism spectrum disorders. The animals also respond similarly to an FDA-approved drug used to treat repetitive behaviors in people with autism. According to researchers who report their findings in the September 30th issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, the mouse model offers a window into the biological mechanisms that underlie the disease...

2011-09-21 19:09:39

Brain disorder accounts for 1 in 4 cases No cure exists for frontotemporal dementia, which strikes between the ages of 40 and 64 and accounts for at least one in four cases of early-onset dementia. Caused by the death of cells in the front and sides of the brain, the disease can lead to dramatic changes in a patient's personality and behavior, including the loss of the ability to communicate. Now UCLA scientists have discovered that a key signaling pathway plays an important role in the...

2011-05-27 07:04:45

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- For decades, autism researchers have faced a baffling riddle: how to unravel a disorder that leaves no known physical trace as it develops in the brain. Now a UCLA study is the first to reveal how the disorder makes its mark at the molecular level, resulting in an autistic brain that differs dramatically in structure from a healthy one. The discovery also identifies a new line of attack for researchers, who currently face a vast array of potential fronts for tackling the...

2010-11-04 01:52:55

Finding could suggest therapies for rebalancing the brain's circuitry in early development Many gene variants have been linked to autism, but how do these subtle changes alter the brain, and ultimately, behavior? Using a blend of brain imaging and genetic detective work, scientists at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior are the first to illustrate how genetic variants rewire the brain. Published in the Nov. 3 online edition of Science...

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2009-11-11 14:45:00

If humans are genetically related to chimps, why did our brains develop the innate ability for language and speech while theirs did not? Scientists suspect that part of the answer to the mystery lies in a gene called FOXP2. When mutated, FOXP2 can disrupt speech and language in humans. Now, a UCLA/Emory study reveals major differences between how the human and chimp versions of FOXP2 work, perhaps explaining why language is unique to humans. Published Nov. 11 in the online edition of the...

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2006-11-20 17:46:07

Six million years ago, chimpanzees and humans diverged from a common ancestor and evolved into unique species. Now UCLA scientists have identified a new way to pinpoint the genes that separate us from our closest living relative and make us uniquely human. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reports the study in its Nov. 13 online edition. "We share more than 95 percent of our genetic blueprint with chimps," explained Dr. Daniel Geschwind, principal investigator and Gordon...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.