Quantcast

Latest DASH diet Stories

1648b7692927f086820578e6fe51bd001
2008-12-26 08:20:00

According to findings from a long-term study, each serving of whole-grains may lessen heart failure risk by 7 percent among middle-aged African-American and white men and women.Dr. Jennifer A. Nettleton, of the University of Texas Health Services Center in Houston, said each serving of high-fat dairy and egg appeared to increase heart failure risk by 8 and 23 percent."A refined grain here, a full fat yogurt there, and the occasional egg aren't going to result in heart failure, but a continued...

2008-09-15 03:00:08

A strict Mediterranean diet provides substantial protection against heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's disease, University of Florence researchers said. The Mediterranean diet is rich in olive oil, whole grains, fruits, nuts, vegetables and fish, but low in meat, dairy products and alcohol, researchers said. The researchers assessed 12 international studies that examined eating habits and tracked participants from three to 18 years. All the studies examined the concept of using a...

2008-09-03 18:00:41

Babies who gain weight rapidly within five months of birth and age 2 to 5 have higher systolic blood pressure in young adulthood, British researchers say. The study, published in the Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association, also found that babies who are lighter at birth have higher systolic blood pressure as adults and immediate weight gain after birth is associated with higher adult diastolic blood pressure. Lead author Yoav Ben-Shlomo of the University of Bristol in...

2008-08-06 15:00:11

ROCHESTER, Minn., Aug. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource attribution is required. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.bookstore.mayoclinic.com/ or call toll-free for subscription information, 800-876-8633, extension 9751. Ways to Avoid...

2008-07-20 03:00:15

By Stall, Sharon The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has increased in the U.S. population from 20 million to 26 million people during 1999- 2004, according to the recently studied National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (Coresh et al., 2007). Diabetes and hypertension, which have also increased, may explain this 30% rise. The staging of CKD (see Table 1) based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (an estimate of kidney function) and albuminuria...

2008-07-17 03:00:12

By Landless, Peter N If you don't stop it, it will stop you . . . dead. There are seldom symptoms. Medical professionals aren't altogether sure what causes it. Yet hypertension (high blood pressure) is one of the world's greatest health problems. It's mysterious, evasive, and lethal. High blood pressure contributes significantly to death rates through stroke, heart failure, and kidney failure. Mass health screening has helped increase recognition of the problem; and wherever patients are...

86a96ea08ea6ce5166591f29e7c57877
2008-07-08 03:00:00

Keeping a food diary can double a person's weight loss according to a study from Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research. The findings, from one of the largest and longest running weight loss maintenance trials ever conducted, will be published in the August issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health, the study is one of the few studies to recruit a large percentage of African...

2008-07-07 12:00:12

NASHVILLE, Tenn., July 7 /PRNewswire/ -- A new article indicates that an increased intake in minerals such as potassium, and possibly magnesium and calcium by dietary means may reduce the risk of high blood pressure and decrease blood pressure in people with hypertension. A high intake of these minerals in the diet may also reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. These findings are published in a supplement appearing with the July issue of The Journal of Clinical Hypertension....

4355cff53f971bc62d3eb99aaa4eed681
2008-02-20 15:25:00

New study suggests fat-free milk may offer protection against hypertension -- a rising risk for women in this countryWomen who drank more fat free milk and had higher intakes of calcium and vitamin D from foods, and not supplements, tended to have a lower risk for developing hypertension or high blood pressure, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal, Hypertension. After examining the diets of nearly 30,000 middle-aged and older women, Harvard researchers...

2006-04-04 14:05:52

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People really can commit to diet and lifestyle changes for the long haul, and the benefit shows up in their blood pressure, researchers reported Monday. In a study of 810 adults with elevated blood pressure, investigators found that those who were given a lifestyle overhaul were generally able to stick with the plan for the 18 months they were followed. Moreover, their risk of having full-blown high blood pressure was about one-fifth lower...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related