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Latest David Kingsley Stories

blond hair genetics
2014-06-02 05:07:21

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A subtle alternation in DNA involving one single-letter change in the genetic code is enough to generate blond hair in men and women, researchers from Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Stanford University Medical Center report in Sunday’s edition of the journal Nature Genetics. According to developmental biology professor Dr. David Kingsley and his colleagues, a molecule essential to stem cell function plays a vital role...

2012-04-04 21:14:45

Reuse of key genes is a common theme Three-spine sticklebacks aren't as pretty as many aquarium fish, and anglers don't fantasize about hooking one. But biologists treasure these small fish for what they are revealing about the genetic changes that drive evolution. Now, researchers have sequenced the stickleback genome for the first time, and they have discovered that as fish in different parts of the world adapted to live in fresh water, the same sites in the genome were changed time and...

2011-03-09 16:34:23

Humans are clearly different from chimpanzees. The question is, why? According to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, it may boil down in part to what we don't have, rather than what we do. The loss of snippets of regulatory DNA, the scientists found, could be the reason why, for example, humans lack the penile spines found in many other mammals, and also why specific regions of our brains are larger than those of our closest relatives. Understanding these and other...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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