Quantcast

Latest David Valentine Stories

Image 1 - Topography Played Key Role In Bacterial Consumption Of Deepwater Horizon Spill
2012-01-10 07:03:59

Scientists document how geology, biology worked together after oil disaster When scientist David Valentine and colleagues published results of a study in early 2011 reporting that bacterial blooms had consumed almost all the deepwater methane plumes after the 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill, some were skeptical. How, they asked the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) geochemist, could almost all the gas emitted disappear? In new results published this...

Image 1 - How Gas And Temperature Controlled Bacterial Response To Gulf Spill
2011-10-04 09:10:14

A new study explains how DNA was used to identify microbes present in the Gulf of Mexico following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill that devastated the region last year -- and the particular microbes responsible for consuming natural gas immediately after the spill. The researchers, from UC Santa Barbara (UCSB), also explained how water temperature played a key role in the way bacteria reacted to the spill. Results of the study were published in this week´s Proceedings of the National...

2011-05-23 13:40:02

A new computer model of the Gulf of Mexico in the period after the oil spill provides insights into how underwater currents may have primed marine microorganisms to degrade the oil. "It is called dynamic auto-inoculation. Parcels of water move over the ruptured well, picking up hydrocarbons. When these parcels come back around and cross back over the well, the bacteria have already been activated, are more abundant than before, and degrade hydrocarbons far more quickly," says David Valentine...

a861193d4b4a0f7f3e15965b7c115c1d
2011-01-07 08:05:00

The nearly 200,000 tons of methane released into the Gulf of Mexico during last year's Deepwater Horizon oil spill were ingested by microbes in just four months, according to a new study published in Thursday's edition of the journal Science. Methane, which made up one-fifth of the crude oil that was leaked into the Gulf following an explosion on the BP-operated rig in April 2010, sank mostly into the deepest part of the waters. There, according to what researcher David Valentine of the...

2010-09-16 20:53:06

In the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, a team of scientists led by UC Santa Barbara's David Valentine and Texas A&M University's John Kessler embarked on a research cruise with an urgent mission: determining the fate and impact of hydrocarbon gases escaping from a deep-water oil spill. The spill provided a rare opportunity for Valentine, a professor in the Department of Earth Science at UCSB, and Kessler, an assistant professor in the Department of...

89541700ac3cdd287e6c8289100d2e8c1
2010-05-24 06:59:11

Do manufactured dispersants interfere with microbes' natural oil-dispersing ability? To understand how the use of dispersants impacts the degradation of oil in the Gulf of Mexico, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a rapid response grant to scientist David Valentine of the University of California at Santa Barbara and colleagues. The massive release of oil from the Deepwater Horizon incident on April 20, 2010, has led to an unprecedented use of oil dispersants, which include a...

fdaeb091070116ca34d6378adf144d0b1
2009-05-13 11:19:02

Reveal "life story" of oil off Coal Oil Point, California Twenty years ago, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez was exiting Alaska's Prince William Sound when it struck a reef in the middle of the night. What happened next is considered one of the nation's worst environmental disasters: 10.8 million gallons of crude oil spilled into the pristine Alaskan waters, eventually covering 11,000 square miles of ocean. Now, imagine 8 to 80 times the amount of oil spilled in the Exxon Valdez accident....

2008-10-08 15:00:34

U.S. scientists have found organisms thousands of feet below the Pacific Ocean's surface off Santa Barbara, Calif., are feasting on oil -- lots of oil. Until now, nobody knew how many oil compounds were being eaten. But the study led by Associate Professor David Valentine of the University of California-Santa Barbara and Chris Reddy of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts has shed new light on the process. "It takes a special organism to live half a mile deep in the...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.