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Latest Daylily Stories

2008-07-25 12:00:48

By Michael Mills, The Philadelphia Inquirer Jul. 25--Be grateful that midweek downpours mitigated the parched conditions in so many gardens. But if the rains again become rare, be prepared to practice prudent triage. Leave the lawn alone and rejuvenate it in the fall.


Latest Daylily Reference Libraries

31_40aab034f774b02141871c12b9817bbc
2005-07-12 16:47:45

Daylily comprises the small genus Hemerocallis of flowering plants in the family Hemerocallidaceae. The name Hemerocallis is based on the Greek words for day and beauty, which reflects the fact that the individual flowers last for only one day. They open at sunrise and wither at sunset, to be replaced by another one (sometimes two or none) on the same stem the next day. Originally from Eurasia, a native from Europe to China, Korea, and Japan, their large showy flowers have made them...

31_aaec4765b2e8c3da0f285a5a60d7ea77
2005-06-23 11:13:55

The Tiger lily (Lilium lancifolium or Tigerlily) is a large and spectacular flower which is also cultivated in Asia for its edible bulb. Like other true lilies, the flowers are borne on an erect stem with linear leaves. The American 'red lily' or 'wild lily' (Lilium philadelphicum) is also sometimes known as the 'tiger lily' because of its black spotted flowers. This lily also has an edible bulb and was eaten by the American Indians. Lilium columbianum from the Pacific Northwest is...

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Word of the Day
saggar
  • A ceramic container used inside a fuel-fired kiln to protect pots from the flame.
The word 'saggar' may come from 'safeguard'.
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