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Latest DCIS Stories

2012-11-29 14:32:03

The combined loss of two tumor suppressor genes, retinoblastoma (RB) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was shown to be strongly associated with progression of DCIS to invasive breast cancer, according to a study published November 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a breast cancer precursor lesion for which there are no established markers defining risk of progression to invasive breast cancer. As a result, the majority of...

2012-04-06 09:25:47

Women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) have high rates of diagnostic and invasive breast procedures after treatment with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) according to a study published April 5 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Breast-conserving surgery is the most common treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ and has proven to be an effective alternative to mastectomy in most women; however, the necessity for and likelihood of further diagnostic mammograms and invasive...

2012-03-23 11:11:34

Negative surgical margins should be attained for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) regardless of radiotherapy, and surgeons should attempt to reach wide negative margins in their first attempt within cosmetic restraint according to a study published March 22 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Margin status is an important predictor of local recurrence regardless of subsequent radiotherapy (RT) for women with DCIS who are treated...

2012-03-22 12:17:42

Radiotherapy treatment (RT) after surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) [1] still has a major protective effect against recurrence more than 15 years later, according to the results of an international trial. Researchers found that the use of RT in addition to surgery could reduce the chances of a local recurrence (the cancer coming back in the same breast) by 50%. Results from the trial, which has one of the longest follow-ups of a large group of patients in the world to date, will be...

2012-03-21 14:20:44

Leading breast cancer charity welcomes findings Women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) need clear communication and tailored support to enable them to understand this complex breast condition, which has divided the medical profession when it comes to its perception and prognosis. That is the key finding of a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing. Research carried out at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK, looked at how 45...

2012-02-07 23:20:54

    Some early-stage breast cancers are potentially harmless, but others invade surrounding healthy tissue and become deadly.     This study has identified a small pattern of molecules that highlights important differences between early-stage breast tumors and invasive, deadly ones.     The findings might lead to a way to identify early tumors that will likely become invasive. Researchers have discovered a restricted pattern of molecules that...

2012-01-30 14:07:59

Majority of Patients Treated Develop Strong, Lasting Immune Responses Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania report that a short course of vaccination with an anti-HER2 dendritic cell vaccine made partly from the patient´s own cells triggers a complete tumor eradication in nearly 20 percent of women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), an early breast cancer. More than 85 percent of patients treated appear to...

2011-12-07 11:01:56

In a significant advance for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, researchers have developed and prospectively validated a multigene test to identify the risk for recurrence of breast cancer. The method combines measuring tumor gene expression with a gene expression algorithm to decipher the genetic underpinnings of a patient's cancer and determine whether the individual patient should be treated with surgery (usually lumpectomy) or a combination of surgery and radiation. This is the...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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