Quantcast
Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest DDT Stories

2009-09-30 01:01:14

Pollutant plumes observed in the United States can be attributed unambiguously to Asian sources based on meteorological and chemical analyses, researchers say. Charles Kolb -- president of Aerodyne Research Inc. and chairman of the committee that wrote the report on air pollution by the National Research Council -- said the report examines four types of air pollutants: ozone; particulate matter such as dust, sulfates, or soot; mercury; and persistent organic pollutants such as DDT. The...

2009-09-03 13:51:47

A U.S. study has found the use of insecticide-treated bed nets can substantially reduce the number of malaria-caused infant deaths. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill said such treated bed nets were given to nearly 18,000 mothers at prenatal clinics in Democratic Republic of Congo. The study determined the nets prevented an estimated 414 infant deaths from malaria. In addition, the researchers said, the intervention prevented an estimated 587 low birth weight...

2009-07-29 17:45:11

Native plant life is growing in a wetland reclamation near Los Angeles that organizers say they hope will also attract invertebrates, rare birds and fishes. For the first time in a century, salt water from the Pacific Ocean is pouring into 67-acre Brookhurst marsh in coastal Huntington Beach, Calif., replenishing an area that was barren much of the 20th century due to a levee that was recently breached. Opening Huntington Beach wetlands to full tidal flow is the single most critical step in...

bf7715af2fbb6180e23db188aa7ef82f1
2009-07-13 15:35:00

 People with Parkinson's disease have significantly higher blood levels of a particular pesticide than healthy people or those with Alzheimer's disease, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found.In a study appearing in the July issue of Archives of Neurology, researchers found the pesticide beta-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) in 76 percent of people with Parkinson's, compared with 40 percent of healthy controls and 30 percent of those with Alzheimer's.The finding might...

2009-05-20 13:34:38

U.S. scientists say they have discovered marine mammals are being exposed to a cocktail of pesticides, as well as new contaminants. In what's called the most extensive study of pollutants in marine mammals' brains, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute scientists found the animals are exposed pesticides such as DDT and PCBs, as well as contaminants such as brominated flame retardants. Eric Montie, lead author of the study, performed the research in collaboration with Mark Hahn and Chris Reddy of...

2009-05-05 12:05:00

 A panel of experts and citizens convened to review recent studies on the link between DDT and human health expressed concern that the current practice of spraying the pesticide indoors to fight malaria is leading to unprecedented - and insufficiently monitored - levels of exposure to it.Although DDT has been largely abandoned as an agricultural pesticide worldwide, its use to combat malaria was endorsed in 2006 by the World Health Organization (WHO) and by officials in the President's...

2009-04-24 08:00:00

WASHINGTON, April 24 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following is a statement from U.S. Malaria Coordinator, Admiral Tim Ziemer on World Malaria Day: Across Africa, young boys and girls wake up each morning just like children here in the Washington D.C. area. The children are no different; they do chores, eat, play sports, and go to school. That is, if they can survive the mosquito bites that transmit the deadly malaria parasites. Those parasites kill an estimated 3,000 children each day in...

2009-04-16 11:22:00

RICHMOND, Va., April 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An African child dies every 30 seconds from this same disease; nearly a half billion people become ill because of it. About 1 million children under the age of 5 die each year from malaria -- a disease that is entirely preventable. As World Malaria Day approaches April 25, Christian Children's Fund Senior Program Health Specialist David Shanklin stresses the importance of education about the disease. "Education is the foundation for...

2009-04-07 09:51:10

A U.S.-led study suggests insecticides that would kill just older mosquitoes would be a better way of controlling malaria. Pennsylvania State University Professor Andrew Read said such an approach would be a more sustainable way of controlling the disease and might lead to evolution-proof insecticides that never become obsolete. Each year malaria kills about a million people, but many of the chemicals used to kill the insects become ineffective, the scientists said, since repeated exposure to...

2009-04-07 08:41:20

Killing just the older mosquitoes would be a more sustainable way of controlling malaria, according to entomologists who add that the approach may lead to evolution-proof insecticides that never become obsolete.Each year malaria -- spread through mosquito bites -- kills about a million people, but many of the chemicals used to kill the insects become ineffective. Repeated exposure to an insecticide breeds a new generation of mosquitoes that are resistant to that particular...