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Latest DDT Stories

2008-08-18 21:00:24

By ERIK ROBINSON USGS scientist Jim Kaiser holds a juvenile osprey on the Willamette River on July 16. Ospreys are tested to determine the health of a river because they eat the fish, and pollutants will accumulate in the birds. USGS scientist Jim Kaiser runs tests on a juvenile osprey in July. The raptors are tolerant of short-term disturbances by scientists. People strolling along Vancouver's Waterfront Trail may have noticed a curious sight earlier this summer. Three people in a...

2008-07-11 15:00:38

By KARIN KAPSIDELIS Be careful what you let in your home, says a researcher who studies indoor air and dust contamination. "It ends up being part of your environment," said Julia Brody, executive director of the Silent Spring Institute in Newton, Mass. "You end up breathing it, and it gets on your hands." It's a tough problem for consumers to deal with, she said, because products are not always labeled with the chemicals they contain. She recommends using natural fibers such as wool for...

2008-07-09 00:00:16

By John McCoy MOOREFIELD - West Virginia has experienced quite a few environmental success stories since the early 1970s. Whole forests once cleared for timber have regenerated. The woods are full of deer. Black bears are more abundant than ever. The Kanawha and Ohio rivers have been cleaned up. Paddlefish and sturgeon have been reintroduced. Hatcheries grow walleye and muskellunge that are better adapted to West Virginia's waters. Still, none of those stir West Virginians' pride quite...

2008-07-02 06:00:47

By Ormad, M P Ratia, J S; Rodriguez, L; Ovelleiro, J L ABSTRACT: The evolution over time of the levels and distribution of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in water, surface sediments, and fish from the River Cinca (Spain), a tributary of the River Ebro, during the period 1999 to 2004, was investigated by means of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The sampling site corresponded to a point downstream from Monzon, a heavily industrialized town with drainage into the...

2008-06-30 21:02:34

The North Dakota Agriculture Department is getting ready for its annual Project Safe Send program. North Dakota residents can bring old and unusable pesticides to 16 sites around the state in July, and dispose of them for free. The program is to start July 8 in West Fargo and wrap up in Cando on July 24. Project Safe Send has disposed of more than 2 million pounds of pesticides such as DDT, arsenic and mercury since 1992, according to Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson. The...

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2008-05-09 13:45:00

A new study has found that Antarctica's Adelie penguins have recently been exposed to trace levels of the chemical DDT as a result of frozen stores of the pesticide seeping out of the continent's melting glaciers.The chemical's presence could indicate that other frozen toxins will be released as a result of climate change in the environment, according to Heidi Geisz, a marine biologist at Virginia Institute of Marine Science.  Geisz, who has worked in Antarctica since 1999, led the team...

2008-04-24 06:00:47

By Langman, Jimmy Multinational pesticide corporations headquartered in the Global North are expanding their sales of some of the most dangerous chemicals in Latin America-chemicals known to cause a plethora of health problems, including cancers and birth defects. This is happening even as U.S. and E.U. laws have banned or severely restricted many of the pesticides and UN conventions have come into force. A NACLA investigation supported by the Samuel Chavkin Investigative Journalism Fund...

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2008-02-27 07:41:47

Pesticides, heavy metals and other airborne contaminants are raining down on national parks across the West and Alaska, turning up at sometimes dangerously high levels in lakes, plants and fish. A sweeping, six-year federal study released Tuesday found evidence of 70 contaminants in 20 national parks and monuments - from Denali in Alaska and Glacier in Montana, to Big Bend in Texas and Yosemite in California. The findings revealed that some of the Earth's most pristine wilderness is still...

2008-02-17 03:00:15

By Foster, John Bellamy Clark, Brett Rachel Carson was born just over 100 years ago in 1907. Her most famous book Silent Spring, published in 1962, is often seen as marking the birth of the modern environmental movement. Although an immense amount has been written about Carson and her work, the fact that she was objectively a "woman of the left" has often been downplayed. Today the rapidly accelerating planetary ecological crisis, which she more than anyone else alerted us to, calls for an...

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2008-02-09 06:00:00

Celebrating the phoenix-like recovery of the brown pelican, brought to near-extinction 40 years ago by potent insecticides, U.S. Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne on Friday proposed removing the big-beaked coastal bird from the endangered species list. Kempthorne, speaking in Baton Rouge, La., said more than 620,000 of the pelicans now inhabit the U.S. Gulf and Pacific coasts, the Caribbean and Latin America. Last year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Texas Coastal Program counted...


Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin