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Latest Dead zone Stories

2008-08-17 12:00:19

By BINA VENKATARAMAN By Bina Venkataraman The New York Times Many coastal areas of the world's oceans are being starved of oxygen at an alarming rate, with vast stretches along the seafloor depleted of it to the point where they can barely sustain marine life, researchers are reporting. The main culprit, scientists say, is nitrogen-rich nutrients from crop fertilizers that spill into coastal waters by way of rivers and streams. A study to be published today in the journal Science...

2008-08-14 16:41:06

Parts of the world's oceans are running low on oxygen, a new study finds. Fertilizers and other chemical pollutants in river runoff fuel blooms of algae that cause oxygen levels to dip precipitously when they die. A review of research into these so-called "dead zones," detailed in the Aug. 15 issue of the journal Science, finds that the number of dead zones has roughly doubled every decade since the 1960's. The study authors, Robert Diaz of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and...

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2008-08-15 10:47:01

Areas of the world's oceans known as "dead zones" because they lack proper oxygen levels to sustain most marine life, continue to grow worldwide at an unprecedented rate, scientists reported on Thursday. Scientists point to runoff of nitrogen and phosphorous-containing agricultural fertilizers as the primary cause of the recent expansion. Nitrogen compounds from burning fossils fuels, particularly from power plants and cars, also are settling back to the ground and eventually wash into...

2008-08-14 21:00:17

U.S. and Swedish research suggests the number of dead zones in the world's oceans has increased by a third since 1995. Robert Diaz of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science at the College of William and Mary said dead zones -- areas of the ocean with too little oxygen to support most marine life -- "rank with overfishing, habitat loss and harmful algal blooms as global environmental problems." Agricultural fertilizers are one of the key causes of the dead zones, the Virginia Institute of...

2008-08-14 15:00:35

A U.S. scientist predicts continued overfishing will lead to the extinction of the Earth's edible species of fish and affect other levels of the food chain. But Jeremy Jackson, a senior scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, says just the enforcement of fishery regulations would help prevent such extinctions. Jackson says certain steps, if taken immediately, might reverse the demise of the Earth's ocean species. Those measures...

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2008-08-14 11:14:39

Jeremy Jackson, senior scientist emeritus of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, asserts in the Aug. 12 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that the following steps, if taken immediately, could reverse the demise of the oceans: Establish marine reserves, enforce fishing regulations, implement aquaculture, remove subsidies on fertilizer use, muster human ingenuity to limit fossil fuel consumption, buy time...

2008-08-06 18:00:16

By PAMELA WOOD Staff Writer There are two dreaded words that pretty much sum up all thats wrong with the Chesapeake Bay: dead zone. Though scientists say the term is something of a misnomer, it conjures a relatively accurate picture of whats going on below the surface of the bay. The dead zone is a vast stretch of oxygen-deprived water that cant support fish, crabs, shellfish or even little worms. The root cause of the dead zone is nitrogen and phosphorus pollution that comes washing off...

2008-08-04 18:00:26

By PAMELA WOOD Staff Writer There are two dreaded words that pretty much sum up all that's wrong with the Chesapeake Bay: dead zone. Though scientists say the term is something of a misnomer, it conjures a relatively accurate picture of what's going on below the surface of the bay. The dead zone is a vast stretch of oxygen-deprived water that can't support fish, crabs, shellfish or even little worms. The root cause of the dead zone is nitrogen and phosphorus pollution that comes...

2008-08-01 00:06:08

By The Associated Press DES MOINES (AP) - Environmental groups in nine states petitioned the federal government on Wednesday to set and enforce pollution standards in the Mississippi River basin and the Gulf of Mexico.The petition to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency followed Monday's announcement that the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is the second-largest to date at 8,000 square miles.The dead zone is an area of water where oxygen levels are too low to support marine life. It's...

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2008-07-16 13:10:00

Scientists expect the Gulf of Mexico's so-called dead zone to increase to record levels this year due to ethanol use and massive Midwest flooding this season. The strip, which is located off the Texas and Louisiana coasts, could stretch to an unprecedented 8,800 square miles this year, according to scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium and Louisiana State University. That expectation would put the dead zone at almost...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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