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Latest Dead zone Stories

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2008-07-14 18:35:00

It's summertime and people are flocking to the coasts around the country. But when summer storms arrive, it's not only beach-goers who are affected; the rains can also have an impact on living creatures far below the ocean surface. Summer storms sweep fertilizers into the rivers and streams and carry them to the shoreline. Once the plumes of storm and river runoff reach the coast, the nutrients in fertilizers can feed tiny ocean plants, called phytoplankton, which can bloom and create "dead...

2008-07-13 09:00:00

By Robert Morris, The Sun News, Myrtle Beach, S.C. Jul. 13--Four years ago, area anglers watched the whole ocean turn on its head. Live minnows in bait buckets at the end of fishing piers died within minutes. Deepwater fish -- jack crevalle and ribbonfish -- suddenly started skirting the surf. Fish kills were reported, but strangest of all was the flounder. "It was weird. It was one right after another," said Ron Lovelace, who recalled that he and his friends caught 50 or 60...

2008-06-24 15:02:34

GULFPORT - Mississippi scientists are watching for the possible spread of an area of oxygen-depleted water off the Louisiana coast that could move eastward. A recently released study suggests the dead zone could be more than 10,000 square miles this summer. It has averaged about 6,000 square miles since 1990. The dead zone forms as substances from farms, such as nitrogen and phosphorous, travel down the Mississippi River or one of its tributaries and into the Gulf of Mexico. The...

2008-06-16 12:00:28

A U.S. governmental task force has released a plan that involves state and federal officials in reducing hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The plan, which includes proposals for improving water quality in the Mississippi River basin water, was released Monday by the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force. It builds on recommendations issued in 2001 by incorporating innovative approaches and the latest science, including findings from the Environmental...

2008-06-14 09:00:00

TAMPA -- Scientists expect the expanse of lifeless water in the Gulf of Mexico called the Dead Zone to be the largest since measurements began in 1990 and to cover an area the size of Massachusetts. If the prediction is true, the Dead Zone -- an area off the Louisiana and Texas coasts that is devoid of oxygen, and where sea life either escapes or suffocates -- would cover 9,869 to 10,271 square miles. That would make it 17 percent to 21 percent larger than one in 2002, the largest ever...

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2008-04-02 11:00:00

Researchers at Texas A&M University have confirmed for the first time that a "dead zone" has existed off the Texas coast for at least the past 23 years and will likely remain there, causing potential harmful effects to marine life in the area.Steve DiMarco, associate professor in Texas A&M's College of Geosciences who has studied dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico for more than 15 years, believes the dead zone area off the Texas coast extends from the Texas-Louisiana border area to...

2008-01-24 14:13:10

Like bank accounts, the nutrient cycles that influence the natural world are regulated by inputs and outputs. If a routine withdrawal is overlooked, balance sheets become inaccurate. Over time, overlooked deductions can undermine our ability to understand and manage ecological systems. Recent research by the Universit© de Montr©al (Canada) and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies (Millbrook, New York) has revealed an important, but seldom accounted for, withdrawal in the global...

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2007-12-17 15:15:00

By HENRY C. JACKSON JEFFERSON, Iowa - Because of rising demand for ethanol, American farmers are growing more corn than at any time since the Depression. And sea life in the Gulf of Mexico is paying the price. The nation's corn crop is fertilized with millions of pounds of nitrogen-based fertilizer. And when that nitrogen runs off fields in Corn Belt states, it makes its way to the Mississippi River and eventually pours into the Gulf, where it contributes to a growing "dead zone" - a...

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2007-06-13 06:00:00

WASHINGTON -- There was hope for a cure down in the Louisiana bayous even as the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone expanded like a B-movie blob. The year was 2000 and states up and down the Mississippi River, spurred by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, were coming to grips with one of America's most vexing water quality challenges: the fertilizer runoff from Midwestern farm fields flowing hundreds of miles south to the Gulf of Mexico. A mass of oxygen-deprived water had expanded in...

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2006-08-11 18:55:00

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Scientists say the oxygen-starved "dead zone" along the Pacific Coast that is causing massive crab and fish die-offs is worse than initially thought. Scientists say weather, not pollution, appears to be the culprit, and no relief is in sight. However, some say there is no immediate sign yet of long-term damage to the crab fishery. Oregon State University scientists looking for weather changes that could reverse the situation aren't finding them, and they say levels of...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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