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Latest Deep sea Stories

2009-07-10 10:10:00

Dr. Craig R. Smith, oceanography professor at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, recently published a paper in Marine Ecology Progress Series titled, "Biogeochemistry of a deep-sea whale fall: sulfate, reduction, sulfide efflux and methanogenesis."The research by Smith and collaborators is the first detailed study of microbial processes at a deep-sea whale fall. The work evaluated the biogeochemical effects of a 30-ton whale carcass deployed at 1,675 mile depth for...

2009-03-09 20:56:09

China is working on plans to send a manned submersible to what it says would be an unprecedented depth of 23,000 feet below the ocean's surface, officials say. Sun Zhihui, director of the State Oceanic Administration, said Monday the deep-sea vehicle was built last year and testing would begin this year, Xinhua reported. The specific timetable for the test was still under discussion. The maximum depth reached in a manned submersible so far is about 21,300 feet, the Chinese-run news agency...

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2009-02-23 14:10:00

Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute recently solved the half-century-old mystery of a fish with tubular eyes and a transparent head. Ever since the "barreleye" fish Macropinna microstoma was first described in 1939, marine biologists have known that it's tubular eyes are very good at collecting light. However, the eyes were believed to be fixed in place and seemed to provide only a "tunnel-vision" view of whatever was directly above the fish's head. A new paper by...

2009-02-17 13:55:00

Rave Reviews, Stunning IMAX(R) 3D Images and Enthusiastic Audiences Make Waves in IMAX(R) Theatres LOS ANGELES, Feb. 17 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ - Warner Bros. Pictures Inc. and IMAX Corporation (Nasdaq: IMAX; TSX: IMX) today announced that Under the Sea 3D, narrated by Jim Carrey, opened to rave reviews in IMAX(R) theatres over the weekend, earning a total of $914,000 in domestic box office receipts on 49 screens for a per screen average of $18,661. These opening weekend results...

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2009-02-08 15:14:45

A team of scientists led by the University of Minnesota has discovered that iron dust, the rare but necessary nutrient for most life, can not only be washed into the ocean from rivers or blown out to sea, but it can bubble up from the depths of the ocean floor. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, connects life at the surface to events occurring at extreme depths and pressures"”two worlds long assumed to have little interaction. Brandy Toner, an assistant professor in...

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2008-11-12 09:45:00

Setting sail on the Pacific, a University of Delaware-led research team has embarked on an extreme adventure that will find several of its members plunging deep into the sea to study hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. The team, which will be conducting research in environments that include scalding heat, high pressure, toxic chemicals and total darkness, is part of the National Science Foundation-funded "Extreme 2008: A Deep-Sea Adventure." The scientists are being joined by students from...

2008-10-08 06:00:23

By Frank Urquhart A STAGGERING five miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, scientists had been hoping, at best, to film a solitary fish able to exist in the deepest reaches of the world's seas. And they assumed anything they succeeded in capturing on film would almost certainly be a "monster" - a weird and ugly specimen similar to the shrivelled samples of deep-sea species preserved in the world's marine research institutes. But a team of marine biologists, led by scientists at...

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2008-10-07 12:20:00

Scientists say they may have discovered the "deepest ever" living fish. The 17-strong shoal were found by a UK-Japan team at depths of 7.7km (4.8 miles) in the Japan Trench in the Pacific where they were able to capture them on film. The catch was made using remote-operated landers designed to withstand immense pressures to comb the world's deepest depths for marine life. The 30cm-long (12in), deep-sea fish were surprisingly "cute", according to Monty Priede from the University of Aberdeen...

2007-08-08 03:05:00

By Simon Usborne It was a journey to the bottom of the Gulf of Maine in 2005 that inspired Claire Nouvian to put together an unprecedented showcase of creatures from the bottom of our seas. Plunging down 1,000 metres in a pressurised submersible, she calls the experience the "most incredible moment" of her life. "It was so beautiful and so intense, it changed me for ever." Two years on, the French wildlife journalist and film director has amassed a gallery of mesmerising finned octopuses,...

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2006-03-30 07:10:00

The microbes that inhabit deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments may be relics of the earliest life on Earth. Some of the most arresting images of life on our planet have come from the deep-sea world of hydrothermal vents. Massive chimneys belching superheated fluids, colonies of giant crimson-tipped tubeworms swaying in the current, swarms of tiny shrimp, albino crabs. These ecosystems, although isolated from life on the surface, contain a virtual zoo of creatures, thriving under...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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