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Latest Default network Stories

2014-01-15 10:34:13

Everybody feels pain differently, and brain structure may hold the clue to these differences. In a study published in the current online issue of the journal Pain, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have shown that the brain's structure is related to how intensely people perceive pain. "We found that individual differences in the amount of grey matter in certain regions of the brain are related to how sensitive different people are to pain," said Robert Coghill, Ph.D.,...

2013-08-20 15:04:24

Both Aß and tau pathology appear to be associated with default mode network integrity before clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), according to a study by Liang Wang, M.D., and colleagues at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Accumulation of Aß and tau proteins, the pathologic hallmarks of AD, starts years before clinical onset. Pathophysiological abnormalities in the preclinical phase of AD may be detected using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or neuroimaging biomarkers,...

2012-06-06 05:35:03

(Ivanhoe Newswire) - Every 45 seconds, someone suffers a stoke. They not only cause physical impairments, but also brain impairments. In fact, new research has linked post-stroke depression to a functional brain impairment. Researchers studying stroke patients have found a strong association between impairments in a network of the brain involved in emotional regulation and the severity of post-stroke depression. Lead researcher Igor Sibon, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurology at the...

2012-04-03 20:08:07

Reports new study in Biological Psychiatry Depressed individuals with a tendency to ruminate on negative thoughts, i.e. to repeatedly think about particular negative thoughts or memories, show different patterns of brain network activation compared to healthy individuals, report scientists of a new study in Biological Psychiatry. The risk for depression is increased in individuals with a tendency towards negative ruminations, but patterns of autobiographic memory also may be predictive...

2011-11-23 06:49:32

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Advanced meditators appear to be able to switch off areas of the brain associated with daydreaming, autism and schizophrenia, according to this study conducted by Yale researchers. Meditation's ability to help people stay focused on the moment has been associated with increased happiness levels, Judson A. Brewer, assistant professor of psychiatry and lead author of the study, was quoted as saying. Understanding how meditation works will aid investigation into a...

Image 1 - How Does Your Brain Benefit From Meditation?
2011-11-22 04:57:16

Experienced meditators seem to be able switch off areas of the brain associated with daydreaming as well as psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, according to a new brain imaging study by Yale researchers. Meditation's ability to help people stay focused on the moment has been associated with increased happiness levels, said Judson A. Brewer, assistant professor of psychiatry and lead author of the study published the week of Nov. 21 in the Proceedings of the National...

2011-11-04 21:33:17

To be able to focus on the world, we need to turn a part of ourselves off for a short while, and this is precisely what our brain does They demonstrate more specifically that when we need to concentrate, this network disrupts the activation of other specialized neurones when it is not deactivated enough. The results have just been published in the Journal of Neuroscience. When we focus on the things around us, certain parts of the brain are activated: this network, well known to...

2011-05-02 19:45:01

Higher levels of cell chatter boost amyloid beta in the brain regions that Alzheimer's hits first, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. Amyloid beta is the main ingredient of the plaque lesions that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's. These brain regions belong to a network that is more active when the brain is at rest. The discovery that cells in these regions communicate with each other more often than cells in other parts of the brain may help explain...

2011-01-18 14:53:08

Watching the brain's "autopilot" network in real time may help determine the onset of cognitive decline and potentially aid in making an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. While traditional MRI and imaging studies conducted in Alzheimer's disease have focused on the anatomy and function of individual regions of the brain, the Duke team conducted the first study to test how the integrity of an entire brain network relates to...

2010-11-18 16:31:23

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that differs between the sexes in terms of age at onset, symptomatology, response to medication, and structural brain abnormalities. Now, a new study from the Universit© de Montr©al shows that there is gender difference between men and women's mental ability "“ with women performing better than men. These findings, published recently in, Schizophrenia Research, have implications for the more than 300 000 affected Canadians. "We are the first...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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