Quantcast

Latest Deliriants Stories

Exhaust Fumes Derail Dinner For Hungry Moths
2014-06-27 03:34:54

Sandra Hines, University of Washington Car and truck exhaust fumes that foul the air for humans also cause problems for pollinators. In new research on how pollinators find flowers when background odors are strong, University of Washington and University of Arizona researchers have found that both natural plant odors and human sources of pollution can conceal the scent of sought-after flowers. When the calories from one feeding of a flower gets you only 15 minutes of flight, as is...

2012-06-06 21:42:30

The discovery of the first enzyme in the pathway sheds new light on the evolution of alkaloid formation Humans encounter alkaloids every day Alkaloids constitute a very large group of natural nitrogen-containing compounds with diverse effects on the human organism. A large variety of plant-produced alkaloids have strong pharmacological effects, and are used as toxins, stimulants, pharmaceuticals or recreational drugs, including caffeine, nicotine, morphine, quinine, strychnine, atropine...

'Horror Stories' Surfacing of Deadly Columbian Mind-Control Drug
2012-05-14 04:23:50

Experts are warning about a dangerous drug currently being dealt in Colombia that can reportedly rob an individual of their free will, making them vulnerable to criminals and attackers, or erase their memories. The drug is known as scopolamine, and according to Gizmodo reporter Sam Biddle, the substance, which is derived from plants like cocaine, "will turn you into an insane zombie and probably kill you." Scopolamine, otherwise known as "The Devil's Breath," was tested by the CIA as a...

333b512f66861265c5961da06cd3e75a1
2009-03-05 10:05:00

Moths need just the essence of a flower's scent to identify it, according to new research from The University of Arizona in Tucson. Although a flower's odor can be composed of hundreds of chemicals, a moth uses just a handful to recognize the flower. It's like identifying a piece of music from hearing only the notes played by a few key instruments, said lead researcher Jeffrey A. Riffell. "The moth isn't paying attention to all the chemicals at the same time," Riffell said. "It's actually...

2008-07-11 09:01:07

Q: You mentioned several types of medications that increase the risk of hyperthermia during hot weather. Would you provide a detailed list? A: Hot weather can cause the body to overheat, called hyperthermia. The evaporation of sweat is the body's primary way of cooling off. Numerous medications impair the body's ability to sweat and so boost the risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke, conditions covered in a recent column. The chief culprits are drugs with anticholinergic effects,...

2007-10-26 06:00:19

WICHITA, Kan. _ Over the years, jimson weed has drawn attention. Georgia O'Keeffe painted it. Gene Autry sang about it. And recently, some Derby, Kan., teens have become seriously ill after ingesting the plant. What many people might not realize about the common weed with the trumpet-shaped, white or purple flower is that consuming it can trigger a powerful hallucinogenic effect and that the plant's chemical effects can be fatal. Every summer or fall, when the plant matures, some teens...

2007-10-25 15:00:47

By PETER GOTT Dear Dr. Gott: As a senior of 73 years, I have been taking diphenhydramine (Benadryl) for several years as a sleep aid with no apparent side effects. An article in the AARP bulletin states "diphenhydramine is mostly bad news because its adverse effects are amplified in older people." Further, the lead author concludes that diphenhydramine "is a horrible choice (for seniors) -- I almost can't think of anything worse." What is your position on the matter? I am sure...

2007-06-20 06:00:10

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. _ I was happy to see the label "poisonous" on the plant Brugmansia when I visited a garden center in the other day. I applaud them for letting the public know _ especially shoppers who have curious small children or pets. Little is written about poisonous plants, so people are always hearing and questioning the safety of many plants. You'll learn what plant parts irritate your mouth or skin and which ones cause more serious reactions in the "Handbook of Poisonous and...

2006-11-02 15:00:00

Poisonings resulting from teenagers using common jimson weed as a hallucinogen have been reported in New Jersey, California, Colorado and other states. Steven Marcus, director of the New Jersey Poison Information and Education System in Newark, said three poisonings related to the plant have been reported since July, USA Today reported Thursday. (Jimson weed is) all over the place, Marcus said. You can find it on the side of the road. Additional poisonings have been reported this year in...

2006-07-03 15:00:00

CHICAGO (Reuters) - An antihistamine most commonly sold as Benadryl does little to help infants sleep through the night even though parents and some doctors think it does, according to a study published on Monday. Researchers at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, said they based the findings on a test of 44 children age 6 to 15 months, whose parents had reported they woke up in their cribs two or more times a night. In tests conducted in 2004 and 2005, some of the children were...


Latest Deliriants Reference Libraries

31_c737ff73aa3c47be364b2a8cce214e0c
2005-07-12 18:32:21

Datura wrightii (a poisonous weed) is sometimes used as a hallucinogen. It is commonly called Sacred Datura. Datura wrightii is classified as a deliriant, or an anticholinergic. In the US it is, however, called Western Jimson Weed.

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
Related