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Latest Dendrochronology Stories

2008-08-07 15:00:30

A U.S.-led study has used tree rings to investigate human-induced climate change that's projected to cause drier conditions in the mid-latitudes. To assess whether drier weather conditions have started, Ramzi Touchan of the University of Arizona and colleagues studied newly developed multi-century tree ring records from Tunisia and Algeria for a longer-term perspective on northwestern African drought. Using a set of 13 chronologies from Atlas cedars and Aleppo pines, the scientists...

2008-06-21 15:00:00

By T.J. Greaney, Columbia Daily Tribune, Mo. Jun. 21--On the morning of May 19, 1780, the sky over New England turned a dark red. By noon, people were conducting business by candlelight, nocturnal birds had taken flight and flowers had closed their petals. In the deeply religious Colonies, many people thought Judgment Day was upon them. "Men prayed, and women wept," wrote poet John Greenleaf Whittier in a poem composed years later. "All ears grew sharp/to hear the doom-blast of the...

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2008-06-09 12:45:00

Black day of 1780 caused by distant wildfires, MU experts sayAt noon, it was black as night. It was May 19, 1780 and some people in New England thought judgment day was at hand. Accounts of that day, which became known as "ËœNew England's Dark Day,' include mentions of midday meals by candlelight, night birds coming out to sing, flowers folding their petals, and strange behavior from animals. The mystery of this day has been solved by researchers at the University of Missouri who...

2007-05-17 18:08:05

An epic drought during the mid-1100s dwarfs any drought previously documented for a region that includes areas of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. The six-decade-long drought was remarkable for the absence of very wet years.  At the core of the drought was a period of 25 years in which Colorado River flow averaged 15 percent below normal. The new tree-ring-based reconstruction documents the year-by-year natural variability of streamflows in the upper Colorado River basin...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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