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Latest Dentate gyrus Stories

2010-08-18 13:41:32

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists identify a novel feedback mechanism that regulates differentiation of adult neural stem cells St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators showed a gene named Prox1 is a key player in normal development of a brain structure crucial for learning and memory and remains active throughout life, nurturing the cells vital for making new memories. This study focused on a small region of the hippocampus known as the dentate gyrus, a brain...

2010-07-08 15:06:52

Scientists have identified a chemical that makes new neurons grow. The substance works specifically in a part of the brain that is integral to learning and memory. The discovery, made after researchers systematically and painstakingly infused each of 1,000 different chemicals into the brains of live mice, could point the way to a new type of neuroprotective drug for people with Alzheimer's or other neurodegenerative diseases, according to the report in the July 9th issue of the journal Cell,...

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2010-07-08 14:40:07

NIH grantees eye neuroprotective mechanism for Alzheimer's Scientists have discovered a compound that restores the capacity to form new memories in aging rats, likely by improving the survival of newborn neurons in the brain's memory hub. The research, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, has turned up clues to a neuroprotective mechanism that could lead to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease. "This neuroprotective compound, called P7C3, holds special promise because of its...

2010-04-09 07:45:16

Geneticists have known for two decades that fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability, is due to the functional loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in the brain. Now they are beginning to understand how FMRP regulates signaling pathways in the brain that are essential for learning and memory in adults. Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and the University of New Mexico School of Medicine have described new discoveries about...

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2009-12-27 17:15:00

Ben W. Strowbridge, PhD, associate professor of neuroscience and physiology/biophysics, and Phillip Larimer, PhD, a MD/PhD student in the neurosciences graduate program at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, are the first to create stimulus-specific sustained activity patterns in brain circuits maintained in vitro. Their study, entitled, "Representing information in cell assemblies: Persistent activity mediated by semilunar granule cells" will be published in the February 2010...

2009-09-23 13:40:00

Scientists now have a better understanding of a perplexing gene that is associated with susceptibility for a wide spectrum of severely debilitating mental illnesses. Two independent research studies published by Cell Press in the September 24th issue of the journal Neuron provide fascinating insight into the molecular mechanisms that link disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) with the proper development and migration of neurons in the hippocampus, a brain area involved in learning and memory...

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2009-07-09 13:55:00

Although the fact that we generate new brain cells throughout life is no longer disputed, their purpose has been the topic of much debate. Now, an international collaboration of researchers made a big leap forward in understanding what all these newborn neurons might actually do. Their study, published in the July 10, 2009, issue of the journal Science, illustrates how these young cells improve our ability to navigate our environment."We believe that new brain cells help us to distinguish...

2009-01-29 08:25:00

"Remember when"¦?" is how many a wistful trip down memory lane begins. But just how the brain keeps tabs on what happened and when is still a matter of speculation. A computational model developed by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies now suggests that newborn brain cells"”generated by the thousands each day"”add a time-related code, which is unique to memories formed around the same time."By labeling contemporary events as similar, new neurons allow us...

2009-01-05 08:30:13

Diabetics aren't the only ones who need to monitor their blood sugar. New research shows maintaining blood sugar levels could stave off cognitive decline as you age. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers found decreasing activity in the dentate gyrus -- a part of the brain responsible for making new memories -- correlated with levels of blood glucose. Other measures that change as we age, including insulin levels, body mass index and cholesterol, were also analyzed, but blood...

2008-12-30 13:39:29

Maintaining optimal blood sugar levels, even in the absence of diabetes, may help in preserving cognitive health in the elderly, U.S. researchers suggest. Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center in New York say that although it is widely known that the early stages of Alzheimer's disease cause damage to the hippocampus -- the area of the brain essential for memory and learning -- studies suggest that it is also vulnerable to normal aging. Until now, the underlying causes of...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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