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Latest Department of Entomology Stories

Image 1 - Wasp Found In New York Shows Up In Southern California
2012-01-25 04:00:42

UC Riverside entomologist discovered Gonatocerus ater in Irvine; wasp arrived in the United States from Europe In August 2010, an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside discovered a tiny fairyfly wasp in upstate New York that had never been seen in the United States until then. Nearly exactly a year later, he discovered the wasp in Irvine, Calif., strongly suggesting that the wasp is well established in the country. Called Gonatocerus ater, the wasp is about 1...

2011-03-09 13:06:47

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a "cross-talk" between two major biological pathways that involve pain"”research that may pave the way to new approaches to understanding and controlling chronic pain. And they did it with something old, new, practical and basic. The newly published research reveals that analgesia mediated by inhibitors of the enzyme, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), is dependent on a pain-mediating second messenger known as cyclic...

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2010-06-23 07:51:11

Avocado seed moth could devastate California's avocados, warns Mark Hoddle, currently on a field trip in Peru California's avocado industry is worth more than $320 million annually, and has about 6,000 growers farming more than 6,000 acres of land. Indeed, California grows nearly 95 percent of the country's avocados. University of California, Riverside entomologist Mark Hoddle is in Peru until the end of July 2010 to look for known avocado pests, in particular, the avocado seed moth, Stenoma...

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2009-06-20 08:22:43

"To thine own self be true" may take on a new meaning"”not with people or animal behavior but with plant behavior. Plants engage in self-recognition and can communicate danger to their "clones" or genetically identical cuttings planted nearby, says professor Richard Karban of the Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, in groundbreaking research published in the current edition of Ecology Letters. Karban and fellow scientist Kaori Shiojiri of the Center for Ecological...

2009-02-26 07:00:00

DAVIS, Calif., Feb. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- It's a honey of a garden, the judges unanimously agreed. The Sausalito-based Sibbett Group created a series of interconnected gardens with such names as "Honeycomb Hideout," "Nectar Nook" and "Pollinator Patch" to win the international bee-friendly garden design competition, a gift to the University of California, Davis, from the Haagen-Dazs(R) brand. The design, the work of landscape architects Donald Sibbett and Ann F. Baker, interpretative...

2008-07-01 06:00:15

By Fallon, Ann M Abstract In vitro production of the obligate intracellular bacterium, Wolhachia pipientis, is essential to its manipulation as a genetic tool to spread transgenes within vector populations. We have adapted the Wolbachia-infected Aa23 Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line to Eagle's minimal medium, supplemented with nonessential amino acids, glutamine, and 20% fetal bovine serum. When plated at low densities, Aa23E cells grew as patchy monolayers, comprised of non-contiguous...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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