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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Developmental neuroscience Stories

2012-05-23 21:45:46

Researchers have shown in mice how immune cells in the brain target and remove unused connections between brain cells during normal development. This research, supported by the National Institutes of Health, sheds light on how brain activity influences brain development, and highlights the newly found importance of the immune system in how the brain is wired, as well as how the brain forms new connections throughout life in response to change. Disease-fighting cells in the brain, known as...

2012-04-30 15:37:02

UI researchers explore how one cell binds itself to another, shedding light on neurodevelopmental disorders University of Iowa biologists have advanced the knowledge of human neurodevelopmental disorders by finding that a lack of a particular group of cell adhesion molecules in the cerebral cortex–the outermost layer of the brain where language, thought and other higher functions take place –disrupts the formation of neural circuitry. Andrew Garrett, former neuroscience...

2012-04-25 20:17:55

Can one feel too attached? Does one need to let go to mature? Neural stem cells have this problem, too. As immature cells, neural stem cells must stick together in a protected environment called a niche in order to divide so they can make all of the cells that populate the nervous system. But when it's time to mature, or differentiate, the neural stem cells must stop dividing, detach from their neighbors and migrate to where they are needed to form the circuits necessary for humans to...

2012-04-25 11:55:12

New research from UC Davis and Washington State University shows that PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, launch a cellular chain of events that leads to an overabundance of dendrites -- the filament-like projections that conduct electrochemical signals between neurons -- and disrupts normal patterns of neuronal connections in the brain. "Dendrite growth and branching during early development is a finely orchestrated process, and the presence of certain PCBs confuses the conductor of that...

2012-04-16 23:40:11

Lack of regulator can cause neural tube defects Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have found that lack of a specific gene interrupts neural tube closure, a condition that can cause death or paralysis. "The neural tube is the beginning of the brain and spinal cord," said the study's lead investigator Lee Niswander, Ph.D., professor of pediatrics at the CU School of Medicine. "A defect in the mLin41 gene doesn't allow the tube to close because not enough neural...

2012-03-09 02:14:48

New study points to possible new therapeutic approaches in treatment of AD A research group led by Dr. A. Claudio Cuello of McGill University's Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, has uncovered a critical process in understanding the degeneration of brain cells sensitive to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study, published in the February issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that this discovery could help develop alternative AD therapies. A breakdown in...

2012-02-08 14:33:52

Some unusual alliances are necessary for you to wiggle your fingers, researchers report. Understanding those relationships should enable better treatment of neuromuscular diseases, such as myasthenia gravis, which prevent muscles from taking orders from your brain, said Dr. Lin Mei, Director of the Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics at Georgia Health Sciences University. During development, neurons in the spinal cord reach out to muscle fibers to form a direct line of...

2012-01-27 15:31:55

The research, published in Neuroscience, sheds light on what determines availability of the molecules involved in cardiorespiratory control Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University (http://www.ohsu.edu) have discovered that a molecule critical to the development and plasticity of nerve cells — brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) -- is severely lacking in brainstem neurons in mutations leading to Rett syndrome, a neurological developmental disorder. The finding has...

2011-12-21 11:43:31

Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and can reduce blood supply to the heart tissue and damage cardiac cells, resulting in heart failure. New research has investigated if nerve growth factor (NGF) gene therapy can prevent diabetic heart failure and small vascular disease in mice. The study by Professor Costanza Emanueli, British Heart Foundation Senior Research Fellow and colleagues of the Bristol Heart Institute in the Regenerative Medicine Section of the School of...

2011-12-08 07:57:27

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Save the neurons! A new study suggests laquinimod triggers immune cells within the central nervous system produce and release brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, contributing to the repair or survival of neurons; therefore limiting brain damage. Laquinimod is an orally available synthetic compound for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. "Our data are indicative of a direct and sustained effect of laquinimod on the up-regulation of...