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Latest Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy Stories

2006-03-15 14:50:00

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who are physically active before pregnancy are less likely to develop diabetes during pregnancy, a new study shows. It also indicates that the risk rises with the amount of pre-pregnancy television viewing. While smaller studies have suggested that exercise can reduce the risk of so-called gestational diabetes, the current study is among the largest and best-designed that has examined this relationship to date, lead investigator Dr. Cuilin...

2006-03-10 09:29:30

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Gestational diabetes mellitus appears to increase the risk of developing diabetes later in life, Finnish investigators report in Diabetes Care. Dr. Juha S. Tapanainen, of Oulu University Hospital, Finland, and colleagues followed 435 women with gestational diabetes and 435 healthy women (controls) for about six years. A total of 20 women (4.6 percent) in the gestational diabetes group developed type 1 diabetes and 23 women (5.3 percent) developed type 2...

2006-01-16 10:28:17

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Results of a study provide more evidence that engaging in regular physical activity before and during pregnancy reduces a woman's risk developing pregnancy-induced diabetes (a.k.a. gestational diabetes). A lack of exercise may be one of the few modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes, which affects upwards of 7 percent of pregnancies and is associated with harmful effects on the fetus and mother-to-be, according to the authors of the study in the...

2006-01-03 15:17:36

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Pregnant women with diabetes tend to have abnormally large babies, but it seems that active fetuses manage to stay a relatively normal size, new research suggests. While babies of diabetic women are prone to become overly big, a condition called macrosomia, it has been unclear why a substantial proportion do not develop this problem. The "fidgety fetus hypothesis" has been proposed as an explanation, suggesting that increased fetal activity can counteract...

2005-11-15 14:54:29

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - High homocysteine in the early postpartum period is an independent risk factor for the development of diabetes in women with a history of pregnancy-induced diabetes (a.k.a. gestational diabetes), a study suggests. Measurement of homocysteine at six week's postpartum "would be helpful" to identify women with a previous history of pregnancy-induced diabetes at high risk for developing diabetes, study investigators conclude. Diabetes that develops during...

2005-10-04 14:34:46

BOSTON "“ The babies of women with diabetes are two to five times more likely to develop birth defects than offspring of women without the disease. A recent study in animals by scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston helps explain why. The research, appearing in the October issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism, suggests that high blood glucose levels early in pregnancy deprive the embryo of oxygen, interfering with its development. "Until...

2005-06-13 15:57:09

A major international study coordinated from Adelaide, South Australia has shown that treating pregnant women who develop mild gestational (pregnancy-related) diabetes helps their babies and improves the mother's health-related quality of life without increasing the risk of caesarean section. Study leader Professor Caroline Crowther from the University of Adelaide Dept of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, based at the Women's and Children's Hospital, says that until now there has been uncertainty...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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