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Latest Dian Fossey Stories

2006-06-22 20:00:00

By Ed Stoddard ANTANANARIVO (Reuters) - If you have gorillas the tourists will come -- but it may take some time if your apes live in the remote east of the Democratic Republic of Congo, better known for anarchy and conflict than tourism. "It is my dream (to have tourists come) because with tourism we'll have benefits and money coming in," Pierre Kakule Vwirasihikya told Reuters during a conservation conference in the Malagasy capital, where ecotourism is a key theme. Vwirasihikya, a...

2006-06-17 10:12:51

KIGALI (Reuters) - Twelve baby gorillas were given names by Western officials on Saturday in a ceremony aimed at attracting more foreign tourists to the tiny central African nation. Dubbed "the land of a thousand hills," Rwanda is home to nearly 400 mountain gorillas, one of the world's most endangered species, which attracted over half of the country's 22,000 tourists in 2005. Tourism officials face an uphill battle to lure visitors to Rwanda, where around 800,000 people were...

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2006-02-20 13:20:00

ST. LOUIS - Captive gorillas actually are a cultured bunch. Genetics or environment alone cannot explain variations in the behavior of different groups of the apes, a study found. Behavioral surveys of the roughly 370 gorillas in U.S. zoos showed 48 variations in how individual groups of the apes make signals, use tools and seek comfort, said Tara Stoinski of Zoo Atlanta and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International. "What became very obvious is there is a very distinct pattern of...

2005-12-28 09:25:00

KIGALI (Reuters) - Rwandan officials commemorated the life and the 20th anniversary of the death of famed primate researcher Dian Fossey with dances and speeches in the rural highlands where she studied the mountain gorillas she loved. Government officials and locals held traditional dances, gave speeches and laid wreaths at the site where Fossey, who was killed in mysterious circumstances in 1985, was buried. Fossey's work inspired the 1988 Hollywood film Gorillas in the Mist, starring...

2005-12-28 06:40:46

KIGALI (Reuters) - Rwandan officials commemorated the life and the 20th anniversary of the death of famed primate researcher Dian Fossey with dances and speeches in the rural highlands where she studied the mountain gorillas she loved. Government officials and locals held traditional dances, gave speeches and laid wreaths at the site where Fossey, who was killed in mysterious circumstances in 1985, was buried. Fossey's work inspired the 1988 Hollywood film Gorillas in the Mist,...

2005-10-17 17:05:00

By Daniel Trotta NEW YORK (Reuters) - The upcoming movie remake of "King Kong" might outrage some serious scientists, but one expert in gorilla conservation sees the fictional ape as an inspiration. Patrick Mehlman is a field researcher in Rwanda and a vice president of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International. He is also a King Kong fan. "The original 'King Kong' (1933) is one of my favorite movies. I think that's one of the things that as a child got me interested in studying great apes,"...

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2005-09-29 07:15:00

KINSHASA -- Thousands more rare lowland gorillas than previously thought may have survived years of war and poaching in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a U.S. conservation group said on Thursday. Although the eastern lowland gorilla has disappeared from nearly a quarter of its traditional territory, the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International (DFGFI) now estimates there are still between 5,500 and 28,000 of the apes left. Also known as Grauer's gorilla, the endangered ape is found only in...

2005-09-05 12:02:36

By David Lewis KINSHASA (Reuters) - Poaching, logging and disease will soon wipe out the last of the world's great apes unless new strategies are devised to save humankind's closest relatives, conservationists said on Monday. From Democratic Republic of Congo and Nigeria in Africa to the islands of Borneo and Sumatra in Asia, scientists fear populations of gorillas, chimpanzees and orangutans could disappear within a generation without urgent action. "As we sit today, it is...

2005-07-06 13:03:04

LONDON (Reuters) - Mountain gorillas in Uganda and Rwanda, an endangered species, are dying from respiratory illnesses, according to study published Wednesday. Poaching is the biggest killer of the gorillas but new research shows that a quarter of 100 gorilla deaths dating back to 1968 were due to illnesses such as influenza and other viruses. "In a bid to cut the risk of people passing these diseases on, eco-tourists who trek to see the gorillas in the wild already have to stay at least 7...

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2005-06-25 19:50:00

VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Rwanda -- Rwanda's president joined villagers and conservation workers on the edges this national park Saturday to name 30 rare mountain gorilla babies, in what the country hopes will be an annual ceremony for one of its biggest tourist attractions. Among those named Saturday were the only recorded set of twins to survive to the age of 1. Conservation workers and researchers traditionally name primates they track after identifying each one based on the patterns...


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bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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