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Latest Diatom Stories

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2009-10-19 14:18:14

Eutrophication of the seas may have an impact on genetic variation in algae, research at the University of Gothenburg shows. Phytoplankton provide the basis for the whole marine food chain. These microscopic organisms are common in coastal areas, all the way from the polar regions to the Equator, and multiply through cell division. If cells are present in the water mass in large numbers an algal blood develops - a recurrent problem in Swedish seas and along Swedish coasts. Causes of algal...

2009-10-01 12:05:20

Palynomorphs from sediment core give proof to sudden warming in mid-Miocene era For Sophie Warny, LSU assistant professor of geology and geophysics and curator at the LSU Museum of Natural Science, years of patience in analyzing Antarctic samples with low fossil recovery finally led to a scientific breakthrough. She and colleagues from around the world now have proof of a sudden, remarkably warm period in Antarctica that occurred about 15.7 million years ago and lasted for a few thousand...

2009-08-14 10:26:43

Observations made by Southampton scientists help understand the massive blooms of microscopic marine algae "“ phytoplankton "“ in the seas around Madagascar and its effect on the biogeochemistry of the southwest Indian Ocean.The observations were made by researchers based at the National Oceanography Center, Southampton (NOCS) during a 2005 hydrographic survey south and east of Madagascar while aboard the royal research ship RRS Discovery. The fully analyzed results are published...

2009-08-04 10:48:10

Amongst the smallest micro-algae belonging to the group of so-called haptophytes(1) , considerable diversity has recently been demonstrated in our oceans. Scientists from the Marine Biology Laboratory in Roscoff and Oceanographic Laboratory in Villefranche sur Mer (UPMC/CNRS), in collaboration with Rutgers University (USA) and University of Ottawa (Canada), have shown that these photosynthetic microorganisms, highly diversified and extremely abundant, are some of the most important producers...

2009-07-15 12:54:51

Significant sea ice formation occurred in the Arctic earlier than previously thought is the conclusion of a study published this week in Nature. "The results are also especially exciting because they suggest that sea ice formed in the Arctic before it did in Antarctica, which goes against scientific expectation," says scientific team member Dr Richard Pearce of the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS).The...

2009-07-09 09:21:18

New evidence for ice-free summers with intermittent winter sea ice in the Arctic Ocean during the Late Cretaceous "“ a period of greenhouse conditions - gives a glimpse of how the Arctic is likely to respond to future global warming.Records of past environmental change in the Arctic should help predict its future behaviour. The Late Cretaceous, the period between 100 and 65 million years ago leading up to the extinction of the dinosaurs, is crucial in this regard because levels of...

2009-07-07 15:20:00

Southampton scientists have demonstrated an unexpected role of iron in regulating biological production in the high-latitude North Atlantic. Their findings have important implications for our understanding of ocean-climate interactions.Tiny plant-like organisms called phytoplankton dominate biological production in the sunlit surface waters of the world's oceans and, through the process of photosynthesis, sequester large amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A proportion of the carbon is...

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2009-05-03 08:22:11

Endemic diatoms at the base of the lake's food chain depend on disappearing ice Siberia's Lake Baikal, the world's largest and most biologically diverse lake, faces the prospect of severe ecological disruption as a result of climate change, according to an analysis by a joint US-Russian team in the May issue of BioScience. The lake is considered a treasure trove for biologists and was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO because a high proportion of its rich fauna and flora are found...

2009-04-09 07:19:36

Engineers at Oregon State University have discovered a way to use an ancient life form to create one of the newest technologies for solar energy, in systems that may be surprisingly simple to build compared to existing silicon-based solar cells.The secret: diatoms.These tiny, single-celled marine life forms have existed for at least 100 million years and are the basis for much of the life in the oceans, but they also have rigid shells that can be used to create order in a natural way at the...

2009-03-18 08:21:28

 Tiny creatures at the bottom of the food chain called diatoms suck up nearly a quarter of the atmosphere's carbon dioxide, yet research by Michigan State University scientists suggests they could become less able to "sequester" that greenhouse gas as the climate warms. The microscopic algae are a major component of plankton living in puddles, lakes and oceans.  Zoology professor Elena Litchman, with MSU colleague Christopher Klausmeier and Kohei Yoshiyama of the University of...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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