Quantcast

Latest Diatom Stories

220fbce317df93ec2b9039c2fcf1ebf11
2009-03-17 08:46:53

Scientists have long established that the Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming spots on Earth. Now, new research using detailed satellite data indicates that the changing climate is affecting not just the penguins at the apex of the food chain, but simultaneously the microscopic life that is the base of the ecosystem. The research was published in the March 13 edition of Science magazine by researchers with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) LTER (Long Term Ecological...

378592cd24137a5c7b3c3d0a8d2ab3621
2009-01-08 16:50:00

The evolutionary history of diatoms -- abundant oceanic plankton that remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the air each year -- needs to be rewritten, according to a new Cornell study. The findings suggest that after a sudden rise in species numbers, diatoms abruptly declined about 33 million years ago -- trends that coincided with severe global cooling.The study is published in the Jan. 8 issue of the journal Nature.The research casts doubt on the long-held theory that diatoms'...

295fd1d2def4d3f70b5b277ed8bb78be
2008-09-04 10:50:00

A team of scientists is studying the complex ocean upwelling process by mimicking nature "“ pumping cold, nutrient-rich water from deep within the Pacific Ocean and releasing it into surface waters near Hawaii that lack the nitrogen and phosphorous necessary to support high biological production. The researchers are harnessing the power of the ocean to conduct their experiments, using the up-and-down motion of waves to pump deep water to the surface. Their next step is to create a pump...

2008-08-02 15:00:12

BELLINGHAM, Wash. _ A strange brown slime attributed to some kind of plankton bloom is coating nets on fishing grounds in the Strait of Georgia, making it nearly impossible for many local fishermen to get their share of this year's Fraser River sockeye salmon run in Washington state. Gill net fishermen catch their quarry in long, floating curtains of monofilament that don't work if migrating fish can see them. If the brown stuff doesn't clear out in the weeks ahead, other salmon fisheries...

7a9eedfc2fb6ad59c6edafebe601a329
2008-05-02 14:50:00

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new way that phosphorus is naturally removed from the oceans "“ its stored in diatoms. The discovery opens up a new realm of research into an element that's used for reproduction, energy storage and structural materials in every organism. Its understanding is vital to the continued quest to understand the growth of the oceans. The research appears in the May 2, 2008 edition of the journal Science. Ellery Ingall,...

2008-01-14 09:40:09

Certain fish could disappear from restaurant menus and our plates at home by 2100, as global warming changes ocean food webs, a new study suggests. Climate change has the potential to threaten ecosystems all over the world, and those in the ocean are no exception. Two marine ecologists led a study of the effects of climate change on the food web of the Bering Sea, which currently provides about half of the fish caught in U.S. waters each year and nearly a third caught worldwide....

5f6a15be24116f1e17d9f1bd25890bf31
2008-01-11 14:15:00

By 2100, warmer oceans with more carbon dioxide may no longer sustain 1 of the world's most productive fisheries, says USC marine ecologistThe last fish you ate probably came from the Bering Sea. But during this century, the sea's rich food web"”stretching from Alaska to Russia"”could fray as algae adapt to greenhouse conditions."All the fish that ends up in McDonald's, fish sandwiches"”that's all Bering Sea fish," said USC marine ecologist Dave Hutchins, whose former...

2005-09-20 15:27:04

ATLANTA, Ga. "“ Sept. 20, 2005 "“ Nanostructured micro-devices may be mass produced at a lower cost, and with a wider variety of shapes and compositions than ever before, for dramatic improvements in device performance by utilizing very small biologically produced structures. These entirely new biologically-enabled approaches are detailed in the current issue of the International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology, published on behalf of The American Ceramic Society. This...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related