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Latest Diatoms Stories

Growth Of Toxic Algae Caused By Nitrogen From Pollution And Natural Sources
2013-02-07 10:17:49

San Francisco State University Nitrogen in ocean waters fuels the growth of two tiny but toxic phytoplankton species that are harmful to marine life and human health, warns a new study published in the Journal of Phycology. Researchers from San Francisco State University found that nitrogen entering the ocean -- whether through natural processes or pollution -- boosts the growth and toxicity of a group of phytoplankton that can cause the human illness Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning....

2012-01-31 06:13:17

Chemists of the University Jena reveal how algae delete unwanted 'competitors' Every morning when the sun comes up, the ocean ground is radically cleaned. As soon as the first rays of sunlight find their way into the water, the microalgae "Nitzschia cf pellucida" start their deadly 'morning hygiene'. The algae, the size of only some few micrometers, wrap themselves and their surroundings in a highly toxic poison: cyanogen bromide, a chemical relative of hydrocyanic acid, although much more...

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2011-06-03 10:59:35

Scientists discover how "Didymo" algae bloom in pristine waters with few nutrients The pristine state of unpolluted waterways may be their downfall, according to research results published in a paper this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. A species of freshwater algae that lives in streams and rivers, called Didymo for Didymosphenia geminata, is able to colonize and dominate the bottoms of some of the world's cleanest waterways--precisely because they are so clear. Didymo does...

2011-05-11 12:00:00

SAN DIEGO, May 11, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) along with an international team of scientists have published a paper detailing new findings about marine diatoms showing that they utilize a urea cycle and that this cycle enables these organisms to efficiently utilize carbon and nitrogen from their environment. The paper is being published in the May 12th, 2011 issue of the journal Nature. The research team, led by Andrew Allen from...

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2011-03-01 10:04:36

Diatoms account for a large proportion of the phytoplankton found in the water, and live both in the open sea and in freshwater lakes. By reviving 100-year-old spores that had laid buried and inactive in bottom sediment, researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have shown that diatoms are also genetically stable and survival artists. Recent research has shown that diatoms exhibit great genetic differences and that they occur in discrete populations, which means that they multiply...

2010-11-11 22:17:03

Findings, which contradict a commonly-proposed approach to reducing global climate change, are published in Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences LSU's Sibel Bargu, along with her former graduate student Ana Garcia, from the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences in LSU's School of the Coast & Environment, has discovered toxic algae in vast, remote regions of the open ocean for the first time. The recent findings were published in the Nov. 8 edition of one of the most...

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2010-03-16 10:20:00

Adding iron to ocean water, believed to be an effective way to absorb carbon dioxide and fight global climate change, could actually be poisoning marine life, claims a new study released Monday. Researchers from the University of Western Ontario, analyzed water samples obtained from open-ocean tracts in the northern Pacific Ocean. They found that the iron stimulated the growth of Pseudo-nitzschia, a type of algae which releases a toxic substance called domoic acid -- a neurotoxin that can...

2009-07-14 15:03:56

Scientists at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have successfully conducted the first remote detection of a harmful algal species and its toxin below the ocean's surface. The achievement was recently reported in the June issue of Oceanography.This achievement represents a significant milestone in NOAA's effort to monitor the type and toxicity of harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs are considered to be increasing not only...


Word of the Day
ambsace
  • Bad luck; misfortune.
  • The smallest amount possible or the most worthless thing.
The word 'ambsace' comes from a Latin word meaning 'both'.