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Latest Diet soda Stories

2006-05-23 11:30:00

By Martha Kerr LOS ANGELES (Reuters Health) - Alcoholic drinks made with artificial sweeteners lead to a high rate of alcohol absorption, resulting in a greater blood alcohol peak and concentration than from drinks made with sugar-based mixers. The reason, Australian investigators told attendees here at Digestive Disease Week 2006, is the accelerated emptying of the stomach caused by artificial sweetening agents. Dr. Chris Rayner and colleagues at Royal Adelaide Hospital studied eight healthy...

2006-04-28 00:56:25

HARTFORD, Connecticut (Reuters) - Connecticut's state legislature voted on Thursday to ban sales of sodas and other sugary beverages in state elementary, middle and high schools as part of an effort to stem teen obesity. Gov. Jodi Rell has pledged to sign the bill, which would make Connecticut the fourth U.S. state with a strong law in schools to trim the growing American teenage waistline. The ban includes all regular and diet sodas, along with "electrolyte replacement beverages"...

2006-04-27 22:10:00

HARTFORD, Connecticut (Reuters) - Connecticut's state legislature voted on Thursday to ban sales of sodas and other sugary beverages in state elementary, middle and high schools as part of an effort to stem teen obesity. Gov. Jodi Rell has pledged to sign the bill, which would make Connecticut the fourth state with a strong law in schools to trim the growing American teenage waistline. The ban includes all regular and diet sodas, along with "electrolyte replacement beverages" such as...

2006-03-10 17:23:18

Clarifies seventh paragraph By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new study shows that adolescents who regularly consume sugar-sweetened soda have no trouble switching to sugar-free soda if provided the opportunity -- and making the switch may lead to weight loss, especially among heavier teens. The role of sugar-sweetened beverages in promoting obesity is hotly debated. With this study, "we think there now is a very strong case that sugar-sweetened beverages are playing a...

2006-03-09 15:17:00

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new study shows that adolescents who regularly consume sugar-sweetened soda have no trouble switching to sugar-free soda if provided the opportunity -- and making the switch may lead to weight loss, especially among heavier teens. The role of sugar-sweetened beverages in promoting obesity is hotly debated. With this study, "we think there now is a very strong case that sugar-sweetened beverages are playing a strong role in weight gain...

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2005-11-08 16:00:00

CHICAGO -- Here's good news for women who love coffee: Drinking it doesn't seem to cause long-term high blood pressure, a study suggests. But for some reason, women in the same study who drank colas did seem to have a greater risk of high blood pressure. Researchers were surprised at that and cautioned that the study wasn't conclusive. Caffeine is a well-known ingredient in both beverages, and has been shown to cause short-term increases in blood pressure. But coffee drinkers in the study...

2005-08-30 18:43:32

By Chris Aspin MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Coca-Cola Co. has launched 20 new health drinks in Mexico in what analysts say is an effort to fight rivals and also fend off growing medical worries about links between soft drinks and diabetes. Doubling the number of brands it sells, Coca-Cola de Mexico this month started to serve up the milk and fruit-based drinks -- and also drinks with soluble fiber -- in a bid to become a "total beverage company." Coca-Cola said the launch was a...

2005-08-02 12:07:12

By Paul Simao ATLANTA (Reuters) - Coca-Cola Co., the world's largest soft drink maker, said on Tuesday it planned to launch a sugar-free version of its Full Throttle drink in a bid to capture a larger share of the U.S. market for energy drinks. The new drink, which will be called Sugar Free Full Throttle, will be rolled out later this month in convenience stores and other retail locations across the United States, the company said. The planned roll-out comes less than a year after Coke...

2005-07-13 09:18:59

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. consumer group on Wednesday called for cigarette-style warnings on soft drinks to alert consumers that too much of the sugary beverages can make them fat and cause other health problems. People who overindulge in soft drinks are also more likely to develop diabetes and have decaying teeth, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) said in a petition to the Food and Drug Administration. The warnings are especially necessary to help counter the...

2005-07-13 09:15:44

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. consumer group on Wednesday called for cigarette-style warnings on soft drinks to alert consumers that too much of the sugary beverages can make them fat and cause other health problems. People who overindulge in soft drinks are also more likely to develop diabetes and have decaying teeth, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) said in a petition to the Food and Drug Administration. The warnings are especially necessary to help counter the...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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