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Latest Diet soda Stories

2009-08-24 11:39:38

A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity reports that consumption of sugar-free beverages sweetened with low-calorie sweeteners increases dietary restraint, a key aspect of successful weight maintenance.Researchers analyzed calorie, protein, carbohydrate, fat and beverage intake, as well as the dietary restraint of over 300 individuals. The researchers concluded, "Our findings"¦suggest that the use of artificially sweetened beverages may be an important weight...

2009-06-19 16:14:53

Researchers in Germany demonstrated the presence of several artificial sweeteners used in food and drink in waste water. Marco Scheurer, Heinz-Jurgen Brauch and Frank Thomas Lange of the Water Technology Center in Karlsruhe said a range of artificial sweeteners are commonly used in food and drinks, as well as drugs and sanitary products. Use of a new analytical method, the researchers were able to look for seven different artificial sweeteners -- cyclamate, acesulfame, saccharin, aspartame,...

2009-04-30 10:18:00

Leading Penn State Registered Dietitian Kris Clark, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.C.S.M., Clarifies This Year's Popular Diet Myths and Offers Help for Women to Get on Track for Spring/Summer WASHINGTON, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Spring. It's the time of year when we shed our unhealthy winter habits and renew the weight-loss vows we made back in January in hopes of seeing the numbers on the scale drop. Each year, millions of Americans follow the latest and greatest diet trends and widely publicized...

2009-04-27 09:26:00

LINTHICUM, Md., April 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Patients with stone disease could benefit from drinking diet soda. New research from the University of California, San Francisco suggests that the citrate and malate content in commonly consumed sodas may be sufficient to inhibit the development of calcium stones. The study was presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA). Increased alkalinity is proven to augment citraturia, a known factor...

2009-04-27 07:06:06

Patients with stone disease could benefit from drinking diet soda. New research from the University of California, San Francisco suggests that the citrate and malate content in commonly consumed sodas may be sufficient to inhibit the development of calcium stones. The study was presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA). Increased alkalinity is proven to augment citraturia, a known factor for calcium stones. Malate increases the amount of...

2009-04-23 08:58:35

 Liwei Chen, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, is the lead author of a research paper showing that weight gain and obesity are more linked to an increase in liquid calories, particularly sugar-sweetened beverages, than calories from solid food. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document the relative effects of calories from liquids compared with those of calories from solid food on weight loss in...

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2009-04-20 09:29:34

Analysis of government data confirms Americans taking advantage of wide variety of lower-calorie beverage options At Experimental Biology 2009, Dr. Maureen Storey, senior vice president of science policy for the American Beverage Association, today briefed colleagues on her new analysis indicating that consumers of all ages are drinking more lower-calorie beverages than they did several years ago. The data are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health and Nutrition...

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2009-04-08 06:40:00

Losing weight could be as easy as cutting sugary drinks from your diet according to new research. "Consumption of liquid calories from beverages has increased in parallel with the obesity epidemic in the US population," wrote Dr. Benjamin Caballero of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and colleagues. The findings are published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. "Our study supports policy recommendations and public health efforts to reduce intakes of liquid...

2009-03-24 07:00:00

Study Finds Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Increase Women's Risk of Coronary Heart Disease BOSTON, March 24 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Regular consumption of sugary beverages such as soda put women at a higher risk for coronary heart disease. This data is part of a new study led by Simmons College Nutrition Professor Teresa Fung. Published in the April edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the study found a significant positive association between sugar-sweetened beverage...

2009-02-10 15:55:21

Women who drink two or more cans of soda pop per day are nearly twice as likely to show early signs of kidney disease, a U.S. study said. However, lead researcher David Shoham of Loyola University Health System said that the study did not find an elevated risk for men, or for people who drink diet soda. Researchers examined data from a representative sample of 9,358 U.S. adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which included urine samples and a questionnaire about...