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Latest Digestion Stories

2009-07-21 14:40:00

OWINGS MILLS, Md., July 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Medifast, Inc. (NYSE: MED), a leading portion-controlled weight-loss program, today announced the launch of a new line of supplements, Essential1: Digestive Health. Medifast's Essential1: Digestive Health supports a healthy gut environment beneficial for weight loss and keeps the digestive system in optimal balance. "Medifast's Essential1: Digestive Health supplements prime the body for weight loss by providing the right mix of...

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2009-05-07 06:55:00

Salmonella, what's gotten into you? Researchers have been asking themselves this question ever since Salmonella bacteria grown on board the space shuttle returned to Earth 3 to 7 times more virulent than Salmonella grown on the ground under otherwise identical conditions. Figuring out why could help safeguard astronauts from disease and lead to new treatments for food poisoning and other common ailments on Earth. New research by Cheryl Nickerson (Arizona State University) and colleagues...

2008-12-12 10:25:36

Infectious pathogens like Salmonella typhimurium employ a startling array of techniques to skillfully outwit the body's defense mechanisms and produce illness. Through their expression of genes"”the fundamental building blocks of cellular physiology"”such microbes ingeniously adapt to varied environments, modifying their disease-causing potential or virulence.Although the study of a broad range of microbial virulence factors is now well advanced, many pieces of the puzzle are...

2008-10-29 12:00:28

As people age, changes in the digestive tract make occasional digestive issues more likely. In fact, nearly 70 million Americans have some sort of digestive issue every year, and as many as 40% of older, boomer-aged adults have one or more symptoms related to digestive concerns. Enzymatic Therapy(R) has launched the answer for baby boomers wondering what happened to their digestive systems - CompleteGest(1) Renew age-optimized enzymes. Most boomers remember when they could eat whatever...

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2008-06-13 13:55:00

Salmonella is serving up a surprise not only for tomato lovers around the country but also for scientists who study the rod-shaped bacterium that causes misery for millions of people.In research published June 4 in the online journal PloS One, researchers say they've identified a molecular trick that may explain part of the bacteria's fierceness. A team from the University of Rochester Medical Center has identified a protein that allows the bacteria to maintain a low profile in the body,...

2006-06-01 13:10:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON -- We may not be entirely human, gene experts said on Thursday after studying the DNA of hundreds of different kinds of bacteria in the human gut. Bacteria are so important to key functions such as digestion and the immune system that we may be truly symbiotic organisms -- relying on one another for life itself, the scientists write in Friday's issue of the journal Science. Their findings suggest that studying bacteria native to our...

2005-10-10 14:40:00

"Take two cheeseburgers and call me in the morning," may sound like far-fetched medical advice. After all, high fat foods can worsen blockages in blood vessels. But a new study in the October 17 issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that high fat foods can, at least in the gut, soothe inflammation. This action may stop immune cells from attacking food as a foreign invader. Eating -- particularly eating fat-rich foods -- causes cells in the small intestine to produce a hormone...


Latest Digestion Reference Libraries

Large Intestine
2013-04-30 14:11:04

The large intestine is the organ that follows the small intestine but is the last part of the digestive tract before the waste leaves the body. Formation and Orientation The small intestine is on average about five feet long. It is composed of four distinct structural parts; the cecum, colon, and anus. The cecum is the part of the large intestine that comes first. It is separated into three parts. The taeniae coli are three bands of smooth muscle. The haustra are bulges caused by...

Mouth
2013-03-05 14:37:32

The mouth is the beginning of the digestive system which takes in food and mixes it with saliva produced by glands located in the mouth. Formation and Orientation The first part of the mouth is the mouth cavity which contains the teeth and is limited by the lips, the roof, which is the hard and soft palate, and the floor of the mouth. This is the space where food is kept before it moves on to the esophagus. The orifice of the mouth is the line between the lower and upper lips and is...

Small Intestine
2013-03-04 15:13:09

The small intestine is the part of the digestive tract that follows the stomach and is followed by the large intestine. Formation and Orientation The small intestine is on average between 22 feet 6 inches and 24 feet 4 inches. It is composed of three distinct structural parts; the duodenum, the jejunum, and the ileum. The duodenum is the part of the intestine where most chemical breakdown happens; it is also the shortest part of the intestine. It starts at the duodenal bulb and stops...

Stomach
2013-03-04 14:34:35

The stomach is the hollow organ that helps along digestion after mastication (chewing). It is the next step after the esophagus and before the small intestines. Formation and Orientation The stomach is composed of four parts. The cardia is the first part of the stomach in the digestive tract. It is the part of the stomach that allows the food to empty from the esophagus. The most northern part of the stomach is the Fundus. This section is the part that creates the curved part of the...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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