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Latest Dinoflagellates Stories

2014-07-29 23:03:53

Corals that build reefs have few defenses against rising ocean temperatures and other effects of global climate change. The authors of an article published in the current issue of Phycologia seek to recognize a coral species group that appears to have adapted to withstand the physiological stress of ocean temperature changes. Lawrence, KS (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 Phycologia – Corals that build reefs have few defenses against rising ocean temperatures and other effects of global climate...

Infectious Diseases Play Part Of Declining Chesapeake Blue Crab Population
2014-06-17 03:49:40

National Science Foundation It's almost summer. Seafood restaurants from coast-to-coast are serving platter after platter of steaming crabs, ready for hammering and picking. The supply seems endless, but is it? Not if we're talking about blue crabs from Chesapeake Bay. The bay's iconic blue crab population has dropped to levels not seen since before restrictions were placed on the fishery more than five years ago. What's to blame? A long and, by Mid-Atlantic standards, brutal...

How Does Red Tide Knock Out Its Competition?
2014-06-05 03:05:40

By Brett Israel, Georgia Institute of Technology New research reveals how the algae behind red tide thoroughly disables – but doesn't kill – other species of algae. The study shows how chemical signaling between algae can trigger big changes in the marine ecosystem. Marine algae fight other species of algae for nutrients and light, and, ultimately, survival. The algae that cause red tides, the algal blooms that color blue ocean waters red, carry an arsenal of molecules that disable...

DNA Analysis Can Help In Classifying Single-celled Algae
2012-09-20 12:28:58

For nearly 260 years -- since Carl Linnaeus developed his system of naming plants and animals -- researchers classified species based on visual attributes like color, shape and size. In the past few decades, researchers found that sequencing DNA can more accurately identify species. A group of single-celled algae -- Symbiodinum -- that live inside corals and are critical to their survival -- are only now being separated into species using DNA analysis, according to biologists....

'Red Tide' Species Deadlier Than First Thought
2012-07-25 15:15:43

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A researcher at the University of Connecticut and his team have discovered that a species of tiny aquatic organism prominent in harmful algal blooms sometimes called "red tide" is even deadlier than first thought, with potential consequences for entire marine food chains. Professor Hans Dam along with his research group in the school's Department of Marine Sciences have discovered that the plankton species Alexandrium tamarense...

Blue Light Culprit In Red Tide Blooms
2012-02-24 04:57:10

Each year, phytoplankton blooms known as "red tides" kill millions of fish and other marine organisms and blanket vast areas of coastal water around the world. Though the precise causes of red tides remain a mystery, a team of researchers in the United States and Spain has solved one of the main riddles about these ecological disasters by uncovering the specific mechanism that triggers phytoplankton to release their powerful toxins into the environment. "Previous theories about how...

2011-10-27 10:27:24

A team of researchers from the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) have developed an interactive global map of corals and zooxanthellae as part of a hybrid web application titled GeoSymbio. This application provides global-scale biological and ecosystem information on symbiotic zooxanthellae called Symbiodinium which are uni-cellular, photosynthetic dinoflagellates that live inside the cells of other marine organisms like anemones, jellyfish, and corals. Symbiodinium are responsible...

2009-07-16 14:45:15

U.S. scientists say they have conducted the first remote detection below the ocean's surface of a harmful algal species and its toxin. Researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute said their achievement represents a significant milestone in the effort to monitor the type and toxicity of harmful algal blooms. A robotic instrument owned by the aquarium -- a fully-functional...

2008-07-23 03:00:35

By Reich, A Blackmore, C; Hopkins, R; Lazensky, R; Geib, K; Ngo- Seidel, E A "red tide" is a harmful algal bloom that occurs when toxic, microscopic algae in seawater proliferate to a higher-thannormal concentration (i.e., bloom), often discoloring the water red, brown, green, or yellow. Red tides can kill fish, birds, and marine mammals and cause illness in humans (1). Florida red tide is caused by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces toxins called brevetoxins and is most...

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2008-04-25 08:25:00

Conditions are ripe for another large bloom in New England waters; weather and current patterns will determine outcomeThe end of April usually brings the first signs of harmful algae in New England waters, and this year, researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and North Carolina State University (NC State) are preparing for a potentially big bloom.A combination of abundant beds of algal seeds and excess winter precipitation have set the stage for a harmful algal bloom...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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