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Latest Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight Stories

6bace142280b227ae595f691e4da40b41
2009-02-09 09:45:00

In just four years, a University of Portsmouth paleontologist has discovered 48 new species from the age of the dinosaurs, while other scientists took 180 years to identify the same number. Dr Steve Sweetman's discoveries, found hidden in mud on the Isle of Wight, are around 130 million years old and shed valuable light on the poorly understood world in which well known dinosaurs roamed. Steve, a research associate with the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, has found in ancient...


Latest Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight Reference Libraries

Baryonyx_BW
2012-03-22 19:25:37

Baryonyx, meaning “heavy claw,” was a genus of carnivorous dinosaur from the Hauterivian to early Barremian stages of the Early Cretaceous Period (130-125 million years ago). It was first discovered in clay pits just south of Dorking, England, and later also found in northern Spain and Portugal. Only one species is known, B. walkeri, named in honor of its discoverer, amateur fossil hunter William Walker. Walker discovered the creature when he came across an enormous claw sticking out...

Iguanodon
2012-01-11 16:16:53

Iguanodon, meaning “Iguana tooth,” is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It lived in Asia, Europe and North America. Research in the early 2000s suggests however that only one species, I. bernissartensis, is well-substantiated, and lived during the Early Cretaceous Period in Europe. It was first discovered in 1822 and described three years later by English geologist Gideon...

45_d60dcbe192f5e62dab8baf1e4e597a30
2009-09-09 12:51:26

Eotyrannus or "early tyrant" is a genus of tyrannosaur theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Period. It was discovered in the Wessex Formation, on the southwest coast of the Isle of Wight, UK. The remains were officially described in 2001. Eotyrannus was roughly 20 feet in length. It was a fairly primitive tyrannosaur with elongated neck vertebrae and long, well-developed forelimbs. The dorsal surface of the skull was undecorated, unlike more advanced tyrannosaurs. This specimen has...

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