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Latest Dinosaurs Stories

Flapping Baby Birds Provide Clues To Origin Of Flight
2014-09-02 03:34:43

By Robert Sanders, University of California, Berkeley How did the earliest birds take wing? Did they fall from trees and learn to flap their forelimbs to avoid crashing? Or did they run along the ground and pump their “arms” to get aloft? The answer is buried 150 million years in the past, but a new University of California, Berkeley, study provides a new piece of evidence – birds have an innate ability to maneuver in midair, a talent that could have helped their ancestors learn...

dinosaur footprint
2014-08-12 07:36:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A team of researchers led by Jahan Ramezani of MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences has discovered evidence that dinosaurs lived in North America millions of years earlier than previously suggested. Writing in the latest edition of the American Journal of Science, Ramezani and his colleagues state that precise dating of rocks which were found in the southern US and contained dinosaur fossils, suggest the...

dinosaurs shrank to become birds
2014-08-01 05:21:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The grand mystery over how massive, carnivorous dinosaurs gave rise to flying birds has a simple solution, as it turns out – the meat-eaters simply kept shrinking and shrinking over a period of 50 million years, according to research appearing in Friday’s edition of the journal Science. In their paper, an international team of scientists from the South Australian Museum, the University of Adelaide School of Earth and...

dinosaur asteroid
2014-07-28 07:52:02

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Dinosaurs were victims of bad timing, and likely would have survived the asteroid impact that wiped them out had it occurred slightly earlier or later, researchers from Edinburgh University report in a new study. Dr. Steve Brusatte of the university’s School of GeoSciences and his colleagues explained that dinosaurs were at their most vulnerable when the asteroid hit, as a rising sea level and an increase in volcanic activity...

Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus
2014-07-25 04:34:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers has discovered the first-ever fossils belonging to a plant-eating dinosaur that contained both scales and featherlike structures, suggesting that plumage might have been present in a far greater number of species than previously believed. The fossils were discovered in Siberia and belong to a species identified as Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus, according to Dan Vergano of National Geographic. The...

New Evidence Refutes The 'Birds Evolving From Dinosaurs' Theory
2014-07-11 06:58:58

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It has long been perceived that the modern-day bird evolved from the dinosaur millions of years ago. However, evidence from a new study published in the Journal of Ornithology has challenged this common belief. After re-examining a bird-like fossil from China, it was discovered that it was not a dinosaur as first thought. Instead, it was a tree-climbing animal that could glide, according to researchers Stephen Czerkas from The...

New Discovery Reveals Insight Into Feathers, Flight Of Archaeopteryx
2014-07-04 09:52:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Long believed to be one of the first-ever birds, a new Archaeopteryx species has provided additional evidence that feathers evolved long before creatures gained the ability to fly, according to research published online Wednesday in the journal Nature. Researchers from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and the Bavarian State Collections of Paleontology and Geology in Munich, Germany found that the newest specimen of the...

Dinosaurs Took A Middle Road Between Warm- And Cold-Blooded
2014-06-13 09:10:26

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There has been a long-standing debate over dinosaurs: were they cold-blooded like modern day reptiles or warm-blooded like mammals? In the early days of science, and in Hollywood, these prehistoric beasts were depicted as slow, lumbering giants as they were believed to be cold-blooded. But over the past few decades, these animals have been portrayed as swift-moving lizards, more reminiscent of warm-blooded behaviors. New...

Drophyllum leaf plant fossil
2014-06-06 07:06:12

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Forests affected by fires 66 million years ago during the last days of the dinosaurs recovered no differently than they do today, according to a team of researchers from McGill University and the Royal Saskatchewan Museum. The team discovered the first fossil-record evidence of forest fire ecology during an expedition in southern Saskatchewan, Canada, at Grasslands National Park in an area known as the Frenchman Formation around...

New Fossil Evidence Shows Reproductive Changes During Transition From Dinosaurs To Birds
2014-05-30 13:14:34

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Over the course of millions of years, some dinosaurs evolved into the modern birds we see today – and that transition included the shift to a single-ovary reproductive system, according to a new report in the National Science Review journal. The study authors said this change was probably advantageous to flying animals that evolved toward lighter and lighter weights. "The most widely accepted hypothesis for the presence of a...


Latest Dinosaurs Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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