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Latest Dinosaurs Stories

Early Birds Get A Leg Up Due To Shortening Of Tails
2013-08-14 07:23:49

University of Oxford A radical shortening of their bony tails over 100 million years ago enabled the earliest birds to develop versatile legs that gave them an evolutionary edge, a new study shows. A team led by Oxford University scientists examined fossils of the earliest birds from the Cretaceous Period, 145-66 million years ago, when early birds, such as Confuciusornis, Eoenantiornis, and Hongshanornis, lived alongside their dinosaur kin. At this point birds had already evolved...

Feathered Dinosaurs Developed Larger Brains Before Actually Taking Flight
2013-08-01 05:02:29

[ Watch the Video: CT Scan of Albatross Brain ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Feathered dinosaurs actually developed the larger brains needed for flight before actually taking to the skies, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. In the study, lead author Amy Balanoff, a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History and a postdoctoral researcher at Stony Brook University, and her colleagues, used CT scans to...

Intact Hadrosaur Tail Found
2013-07-23 12:07:09

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Paleontologists have uncovered 50 vertebrae of the only complete, articulated hadrosaur tail to be found in the desert of Coahuila in Mexico. The scientists carefully removed sedimentary rock that covered the vertebrae to discover the skeleton of a 72 million-year-old hadrosaur tail that reaches nearly 16-feet in length. The 50 vertebrae excavated remain bound together the same way as when the dinosaur inhabited the planet....

Were Dinosaurs Warm Blooded?
2013-07-19 10:55:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Modern reptiles are cold-blooded, and many researchers maintain dinosaurs were as well. New research from the University of Adelaide, however, suggests dinosaurs may have been warm-blooded like birds and mammals. Professor Roger Seymour of UA's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences argues cold-blooded dinosaurs would have been unable to develop the necessary muscle power to prey on other animals and dominate...

Paleontologists Observe Psittacosaurus Growth Through Fossil Studies
2013-06-28 14:25:17

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Paleontologists from around the globe have shown how the "parrot dinosaur" switched from four feet to two as it grew. Scientists from several universities wrote in the journal Nature Communications about how a Psittacosaurus would grow. These dinosaurs are one of the best-known dinosaurs, with more than 1,000 specimens found from the Cretaceous period in China and other parts of East Asia. The team sectioned two arm and two leg...

Feeding Winter Birds Not Helpful
2013-06-24 14:36:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Freezing temperatures and a layer of snow may make us feel sorry for any birds that remain up north during the winter months, but a new study in the journal Scientific Reports has found feeding these birds may not convey any benefits with respect to breeding. A three-year study that was conducted across nine woodland sites in the United Kingdom by researchers at the University of Exeter and the British Trust for Ornithology found...

Fossil X-Rays Determine Archaeopteryx Had Bright Plumage
2013-06-12 12:51:11

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The ℠dino-bird´ Archaeopteryx has long fascinated paleontologists and a new study in the Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry suggests that the animal had bright plumage and wasn´t all-black as previously thought. Using a series of cutting-edge X-ray experiments, a team led by researchers from the University of Manchester found chemical traces of pigments in a 150 million-year-old fossil of the early bird....

Aurornis Xui Discovery Puts Archaeopteryx Back In Bird Family
2013-05-29 15:30:43

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new discovery made by paleontologists digging in China has put Archaeopteryx back on the map as one of the earliest birds. Archaeopteryx was first discovered in 1861 and, at the time, was professed to be the world's earliest bird. However, in 2011 researchers carried out a phylogenetic analysis and determined that the Archaeopteryx was actually just another feathered dinosaur. If this team was right, it would mean flight...

Tiny New Dinosaur Helps Understand Ancient Ecosystem
2013-05-23 09:00:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Although most of us imagine dinosaurs as large, fierce animals, a team of paleontologists from the University of Toronto, Royal Ontario Museum, Cleveland Museum of Natural History and University of Calgary“¯have highlighted a previously overlooked diversity of small dinosaurs. The study, published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, describes a new dinosaur — the smallest plant-eating dinosaur species known from...


Latest Dinosaurs Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:47:42

John Harold Ostrom (February 18, 1928 – July 16, 2005) was an American Paleontologist who was greatly influential in the revival of scientific research on Dinosaurs. He is best known for demonstrating that Dinosaurs were less like contemporary reptiles but more closely related to large, flightless birds like the ostrich – a theory that holds its ground in the paleontological community to this day. John Ostrom was born and raised in Schenectady, New York. His father was a physician, and...

Robert Thomas Bakker
2014-04-22 14:27:45

Robert Thomas Bakker (born March 24, 1945) is an American Paleontologist known for his contribution to the “Dinosaur Renaissance” and his support of his mentor Ostrom’s theory that some dinosaurs were warm-blooded. He specializes in the ecological context and behavior of dinosaurs. Bakker was born in Bergen County, New Jersey. As a young boy, he developed an interest in dinosaurs following his first trip to the dinosaur exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History – he was...

Ornithology
2013-10-09 12:32:30

Ornithology, a branch of zoology, is the study of birds. The term ornithology is derived from the ancient Greek words for bird and rationale or explanation. This study differs from other sciences because amateurs often take part in studies and because birds are commonly seen. It is thought that ornithology developed in the same manner than biology developed. Drawings from the Stone Age show the earliest interest in birds and the remains of over eighty bird species have been found at excavated...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.